akela


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Akela

(ɑːˈkeɪlə)
n
Brit the adult leader of a pack of Cub Scouts. US equivalent: Den Mother
[C20: after a character in Kipling's The Jungle Book (1894–95), who is the leader of a wolfpack]
Translations

akela

nWölflingsführer m
References in classic literature ?
Akela from his rock would cry: "Ye know the Law--ye know the Law.
O Akela, and ye the Free People," he purred, "I have no right in your assembly, but the Law of the Jungle says that if there is a doubt which is not a killing matter in regard to a new cub, the life of that cub may be bought at a price.
At last they all went down the hill for the dead bull, and only Akela, Bagheera, Baloo, and Mowgli's own wolves were left.
Shere Khan was always crossing his path in the jungle, for as Akela grew older and feebler the lame tiger had come to be great friends with the younger wolves of the Pack, who followed him for scraps, a thing Akela would never have allowed if he had dared to push his authority to the proper bounds.
But remember, Akela is very old, and soon the day comes when he cannot kill his buck, and then he will be leader no more.
It is in my heart that when Akela misses his next kill--and at each hunt it costs him more to pin the buck--the Pack will turn against him and against thee.
Then Akela and Gray Brother had to explain their share of the great buffalo-drive in the ravine, and Baloo toiled up the hill to hear all about it, and Bagheera scratched himself all over with pure delight at the way in which Mowgli had managed his war.
But for Akela and Gray Brother here," Mowgli said, at the end, "I could have done nothing.
But what," said Akela, cocking one ear--"but what if men do not leave thee alone, Little Brother?
Mowgli struck quicker than an average human eye could follow but Akela was a wolf; and even a dog, who is very far removed from the wild wolf, his ancestor, can be waked out of deep sleep by a cart-wheel touching his flank, and can spring away unharmed before that wheel comes on.
That is a sharp tooth," said Akela, snuffing at the blade's cut in the earth, "but living with the Man-Pack has spoiled thine eye, Little Brother.
Gray Brother followed his example quickly, keeping a little to his left to get the wind that was blowing from the right, while Akela bounded fifty yards up wind, and, half-crouching, stiffened too.