alabaster


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al·a·bas·ter

 (ăl′ə-băs′tər)
n.
1. A dense, translucent, white or tinted fine-grained gypsum.
2. A variety of hard calcite, translucent and sometimes banded.
3. A pale yellowish pink to yellowish gray.

[Middle English alabastre, from Old French, from Latin alabaster, from Greek alabastros, alabastos, possibly of Egyptian origin.]

alabaster

(ˈæləˌbɑːstə; -ˌbæstə)
n
1. (Minerals) a fine-grained usually white, opaque, or translucent variety of gypsum used for statues, vases, etc
2. (Minerals) a variety of hard semitranslucent calcite, often banded like marble
adj
of or resembling alabaster
[C14: from Old French alabastre, from Latin alabaster, from Greek alabastros]
ˌalaˈbastrine adj

al•a•bas•ter

(ˈæl əˌbæs tər, -ˌbɑ stər)

n.
1. a finely granular variety of gypsum, often white and translucent, used for ornamental objects or work, as lamp bases and figurines.
2. a variety of calcite, often banded, used or sold as alabaster.
adj.
3. made of alabaster.
4. resembling alabaster; smooth and white: alabaster hands.
Also, al•a•bas•trine (ˌæl əˈbæs trɪn)
[1350–1400; Middle English alabastre < Middle French < Latin alabaster < Greek alábastros]

alabaster

Marble-like stone, usually white.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.alabaster - a compact fine-textured, usually white gypsum used for carvingalabaster - a compact fine-textured, usually white gypsum used for carving
gypsum - a common white or colorless mineral (hydrated calcium sulphate) used to make cements and plasters (especially plaster of Paris)
2.alabaster - a hard compact kind of calcitealabaster - a hard compact kind of calcite  
calcite - a common mineral consisting of crystallized calcium carbonate; a major constituent of limestone
3.alabaster - a very light whitealabaster - a very light white      
whiteness, white - the quality or state of the achromatic color of greatest lightness (bearing the least resemblance to black)
Adj.1.alabaster - of or resembling alabasteralabaster - of or resembling alabaster; "alabaster statue"

alabaster

adjective
Of a light color or complexion:
Translations
alabaster

alabaster

[ˈæləbɑːstəʳ]
A. Nalabastro m
B. ADJalabastrino

alabaster

[ˈæləbɑːstər]
nalbâtre m
modif
(made of alabaster) [figure, vase] → en albâtre
(= smooth) [skin, neck, breasts, buttocks] → d'albâtre

alabaster

nAlabaster m
adj (lit)alabastern, Alabaster-; (fig liter)Alabaster-, wie Alabaster; alabaster skinAlabasterhaut f

alabaster

[ˈæləbɑːstəʳ] nalabastro
References in classic literature ?
Indeed, had I realised how superbly impressive they were going to be, I think I must have declined the adventure altogether,--for, robed in lustrous ivory-white linen were those figures of undress marble, the wealth of their glorious bodies pressing out into bosoms magnificent as magnolias (nobler lines and curves Greece herself has never known), towering in throats of fluted alabaster, and flowering in coiffures of imperial gold.
Then he bathed in an alabaster pool and brushed his shaggy hair and whiskers the wrong way to make them still more shaggy.
Her beauty was illumined by the awakened soul within, as some rosy lamp might shine through a flawless vase of alabaster.
Here was whiteness which no lilies, ivory, nor alabaster could match.
The lamp had grown so dim that its light hardly illuminated the alabaster shade.
Her hair was pure gold rippling back from her alabaster brow.
The nervous excitement of which we speak pursued Valentine even in her sleep, or rather in that state of somnolence which succeeded her waking hours; it was then, in the silence of night, in the dim light shed from the alabaster lamp on the chimney-piece, that she saw the shadows pass and repass which hover over the bed of sickness, and fan the fever with their trembling wings.
Barren attribute as it was, disastrous as its discovery had been in many ways to her, perhaps Mr Clare, as a gentleman and a student of history, would respect her sufficiently to forget her childish conduct with the lords and ladies if he knew that those Purbeck-marble and alabaster people in Kingsbere Church really represented her own lineal forefathers; that she was no spurious d'Urberville, compounded of money and ambition like those at Trantridge, but true d'Urberville to the bone.
The unknown had hidden her face in her hands, which were white as alabaster.
Timidly she touched an alabaster bowl and said: "Ev.
Over the head of the bed was an alabaster bracket, on which a beautiful sculptured angel stood, with drooping wings, holding out a crown of myrtle-leaves.
After being removed from the ice the flesh-tints quickly faded out and the rosy nails took on the alabaster hue of death.