alchemy


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al·che·my

 (ăl′kə-mē)
n.
1. A medieval chemical philosophy having as its asserted aims the transmutation of base metals into gold, the discovery of the panacea, and the preparation of the elixir of longevity.
2. A seemingly magical power or process of transmuting: "He wondered by what alchemy it was changed, so that what sickened him one hour, maddened him with hunger the next" (Marjorie K. Rawlings).

[Middle English alkamie, from Old French alquemie, from Medieval Latin alchymia, from Arabic al-kīmiyā' : al-, the + kīmiyā', chemistry (from Late Greek khēmeia, probably alteration of khumeia, from Greek khein, khu-, to pour; see gheu- in Indo-European roots (influenced, owing to the reputation of Egyptian alchemists, by Greek Khēmiā, Egypt, from Egyptian kmt, Egypt, from feminine of km, black, in reference to the black soil of the Nile valley)).]

al·chem′i·cal (ăl-kĕm′ĭ-kəl), al·chem′ic adj.
al·chem′i·cal·ly adv.

alchemy

(ˈælkəmɪ)
n, pl -mies
1. (Alchemy) the pseudoscientific predecessor of chemistry that sought a method of transmuting base metals into gold, an elixir to prolong life indefinitely, a panacea or universal remedy, and an alkahest or universal solvent
2. a power like that of alchemy: her beauty had a potent alchemy.
[C14 alkamye, via Old French from Medieval Latin alchimia, from Arabic al-kīmiyā', from al the + kīmiyā' transmutation, from Late Greek khēmeia the art of transmutation]
alchemic, alˈchemical, ˌalchemˈistic adj

al•che•my

(ˈæl kə mi)

n., pl. -mies.
1. a form of chemistry and speculative philosophy of the Middle Ages that attempted to discover an elixir of life and a method for transmuting base metals into gold.
2. any seemingly magical process of transmuting ordinary materials into something of true merit.
[1325–1375; Middle English alkamye < Old French alquemie < Medieval Latin alchymia < Arabic al the + kīmiyā' < Late Greek chēmeía,chymeía alchemy]
al•chem′ic (-ˈkɛm ɪk) al•chem′i•cal, al`che•mis′tic, al`che•mis′ti•cal, adj.
al•chem′i•cal•ly, adv.

al·che·my

(ăl′kə-mē)
A medieval philosophy and early form of chemistry whose aims were the changing of common metals into gold, the discovery of a cure for all diseases, and the preparation of a potion that gives eternal youth. The imagined substance capable of turning other metals into gold was called the philosopher's stone.
Did You Know? Because their goals were so unrealistic, and because they had so little success in achieving them, the practitioners of alchemy in the Middle Ages got a reputation as fakers and con artists. But this reputation is not fully deserved. While they never succeeded in turning lead into gold (one of their main goals), they did make discoveries that helped to shape modern chemistry. Alchemists discovered and purified a number of chemical elements, including mercury, sulfur, and arsenic. They invented early forms of some of the laboratory equipment used today, including beakers, crucibles, filters, and stirring rods. And they developed methods to separate mixtures and purify compounds by distillation and extraction that are still important.

Alchemy

See also magic.

the secret of life; a great elixir or remedy sought by the alchemists. See also knowledge.
1. the hypothetical substance sought by alchemists that was believed to transform base metals into gold and give eternal life. Also called philosopher’s stone, elixir of life.
2. Rare. the quintessence or underlying principle. See also remedies.
1. the ideas or beliefs set forth in the writings of Hermes Trismegistus.
2. adherence to these ideas and beliefs.
the occult sciences, especially alchemy. Cf. Hermeticism1. — hermetist, n.hermetic, hermetical, adj.
1. originally, alchemy devoted to medicinal purposes, especially the alchemy of the period 1525-1660, influenced by the theories of Paracelsus.
2. currently, chemistry for healing purposes. — iatrochemist, n.
an alchemist.
the process or act of change, especially from one thing to another, as the change from base metal to gold, pursued by the alchemists. — transmutationist, n.transmutative, adj.
an alchemist who believed that, in one of several ways, it was possible to change less valuable elements into silver or gold.

alchemy

The practice of turning base metals into gold but also of attaining spiritual perfection.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.alchemy - the way two individuals relate to each otheralchemy - the way two individuals relate to each other; "their chemistry was wrong from the beginning -- they hated each other"; "a mysterious alchemy brought them together"
social relation - a relation between living organisms (especially between people)
2.alchemy - a pseudoscientific forerunner of chemistry in medieval timesalchemy - a pseudoscientific forerunner of chemistry in medieval times
athanor - a furnace that feeds itself so as to maintain a uniform temperature; used by alchemists
pseudoscience - an activity resembling science but based on fallacious assumptions

alchemy

noun magic, witchcraft, wizardry, sorcery Imagine that by some political alchemy, all men had been made equal.
Translations
alchymie
alkemia
alkemija
alkímiaaranycsinálás
煉丹術錬金術黄金術
alkemi

alchemy

[ˈælkɪmɪ] N (= ancient chemistry) → alquimia f (fig) (= mysterious power) → poder m mágico

alchemy

[ˈælkəmi] nalchimie f

alchemy

nAlchemie f, → Alchimie f

alchemy

[ˈælkɪmɪ] nalchimia
References in classic literature ?
My old studies in alchemy," observed he, "and my sojourn, for above a year past, among a people well versed in the kindly properties of simples, have made a better physician of me than many that claim the medical degree.
She is the product of an Alchemy of such virtue that he who is able to practise it, will turn her into pure gold of inestimable worth.
He was from beyond the sea, a Doctor Cacaphodel, who had wilted and dried himself into a mummy by continually stooping over charcoal furnaces, and inhaling unwholesome fumes during his researches in chemistry and alchemy.
His mind, therefore, had become stored with all kinds of mystic lore; he had dabbled a little in astrology, alchemy, divination;[2] knew how to detect stolen money, and to tell where springs of water lay hidden; in a word, by the dark nature of his knowledge he had acquired the name of the "High German Doctor," which is pretty nearly equivalent to that of necromancer.
For being an idle boy lang syne; Who read Anacreon and drank wine, I early found Anacreon rhymes Were almost passionate sometimes-- And by strange alchemy of brain His pleasures always turned to pain-- His naiveté to wild desire-- His wit to love-his wine to fire-- And so, being young and dipt in folly, I fell in love with melancholy,
It was as if he had withheld from his wife a secret alchemy that had kept him handsome and attractive, as compelling as when he had come in search of herself so long ago.
Claude Frollo's felicitations to Jacques Coictier bore reference principally to the temporal advantages which the worthy physician had found means to extract, in the course of his much envied career, from each malady of the king, an operation of alchemy much better and more certain than the pursuit of the philosopher's stone.
But why should papers of political import be intrusted to Van Baerle, who not only was, but also boasted of being, an entire stranger to the science of government, which, in his opinion, was more occult than alchemy itself?
She was too occupied in glimpsing the vision of the one lone white man as she had first seen him, helpless from fever, a collapsed wraith in a steamer-chair, who, up to the last heart-beat, by some strange alchemy of race, was pledged to mastery.
In the alchemy of his brain, trigonometry and mathematics and the whole field of knowledge which they betokened were transmuted into so much landscape.
It was an alchemy of soul occultly subtile and profoundly deep--a mysterious emanation of the spirit, seductive, sweetly humble, and terribly imperious.
Clausen," she said, at the same time, by some transforming alchemy of woman, presenting to the newcomer eyes that showed no hint of moistness.