alcohol


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Related to alcohol: Alcohol poisoning, alcohol abuse

al·co·hol

 (ăl′kə-hôl′, -hŏl′)
n.
1. Any of a series of hydroxyl compounds, the simplest of which are derived from saturated hydrocarbons, have the general formula CnH2n+1OH, and include ethanol and methanol.
2. A colorless volatile flammable liquid, C2H5OH, synthesized or obtained by fermentation of sugars and starches and widely used, either pure or denatured, as a solvent and in drugs, cleaning solutions, explosives, and intoxicating beverages. Also called ethanol, ethyl alcohol, grain alcohol.
3. Intoxicating beverages containing ethanol considered as a group: the national consumption of alcohol.

[Medieval Latin, fine metallic powder, especially of antimony, from Arabic al-kuḥl : al-, the + kuḥl, powder of antimony; see kx̣l in Semitic roots.]
Word History: The al- in alcohol may alert some readers to the fact that this is a word of Arabic descent, as is the case with algebra and alkali, al- being the Arabic definite article corresponding to the in English. The second part of the word, -cohol, comes from Arabic kuḥl, the word for a fine powder (most often made from antimony) used as a cosmetic to darken the eyelids. In fact, kuḥl has given us the word kohl for such a preparation. The Arabic phrase al-kuḥ, "the kohl," was borrowed into Medieval Latin as one word, alcohol, "koḥl." From Medieval Latin it was borrowed into English in the 16th century. In English, alcohol came to refer to any fine powder produced in a number of ways, as by heating a substance to a gaseous state and then cooling it. Alcohol could also be used to refer to essences obtained by distillation. One of these distilled essences produced by alchemists and early chemists, known as alcohol of wine, was the constituent of fermented liquors that causes intoxication, and the term alcohol came to refer to this essence (what modern chemists would call ethanol) in particular. Eventually, the liquors that contained this essence began to be called alcohol, too. In the terminology of modern chemistry, alcohol has also come to refer to the class of compounds to which ethanol belongs.

alcohol

(ˈælkəˌhɒl)
n
1. (Chemistry) Also called: ethanol or ethyl alcohol a colourless flammable liquid, the active principle of intoxicating drinks, produced by the fermentation of sugars, esp glucose, and used as a solvent and in the manufacture of organic chemicals. Formula: C2H5OH
2. (Brewing) a drink or drinks containing this substance
3. (Elements & Compounds) chem any one of a class of organic compounds that contain one or more hydroxyl groups bound to carbon atoms. The simplest alcohols have the formula ROH, where R is an alkyl group. Compare phenol2 See also diol, triol
[C16: via New Latin from Medieval Latin, from Arabic al-kuhl powdered antimony; see kohl]

al•co•hol

(ˈæl kəˌhɔl, -ˌhɒl)

n.
1. Also called ethyl alcohol , grain alcohol, ethanol. a colorless, volatile, flammable liquid, C2H5OH, produced by yeast fermentation of carbohydrates or, synthetically, by hydration of ethylene: used chiefly as a solvent and in beverages and medicines.
2. an intoxicating liquor containing this liquid.
3. any of a class of chemical compounds having the general formula ROH, where R represents an alkyl group and –OH a hydroxyl group.
[1535–45; < New Latin < Medieval Latin < Arabic al-kuḥl the powdered antimony, the distillate]

al·co·hol

(ăl′kə-hôl′)
1. Any of a large number of colorless, flammable organic compounds that contain the hydroxyl group (OH). Names of alcohols usually end in -ol.
2. Ethanol.

Alcohol

See also beer; fermentation; wine.

an addiction to absinthe, a liqueur flavored with the narcotic wormwood, Artemisia absinthium.absinthial, absinthian, adj.
a voluntary and habitual self-deprivation, especially from alcoholic beverages. — abstinent, adj.
1. an addiction to alcohol, especially involving compulsive, excessive consumption.
2. the pathological effects of such overindulgence. — alcoholic, n.
an obsession with alcohol.
an excessive liking for alcoholic beverages. — alcoholphile, n.
the state or doctrine of opposition to the excessive consumption of liquor. — antialcoholic, n., adj.
1. a devotion to drunken revelry and carousal in honor of Bacchus.
2. a dedication to such behavior on other occasions. — bacchanalian, n., adj.
the state of being given to excessive drinking of alcohol. — bibacious, adj.
excessive drinking of alcoholic beverages. — bibulous, adj.
drinking together, usually to excess.
a drinking companion.
excessive indulgence in food or drink.
an insatiable craving for alcohol; chronic drunkenness. — dipsomaniac, n. — dipsomaniacal, adj.
an abnormal fear of drinking. — dipsophobe, n.
a device for measuring the amount of alcohol in the bloodstream, usually from the breath. Also called breathalyzer.
intoxication or inebriation, whether regarded as the condition, the process, or the habit.
drunkenness or intoxication from alcohol, especially as a habitual state.
a science that deals with ferments and fermentation, especially those concerned with the production of alcoholic beverages. — fermentologist, n.
drunkenness.
the opposite of sobriety; inebriation.
Jocular. an alcoholic beverage.
skill in the mixing of alcoholic drinks. — mixologist, n.
an adherence to the tenets of teetotalism. — nephalist, n., adj.nephalistic, adj.
1. In ancient Greece or Rome. a wild celebration in honor of certain gods.
2. riotous merrymaking, especially with excessive indulgence in sex, alcohol, and drugs. — orgiast, n.orgiastic, adj.
extreme thirst; an abnormal and continuous craving for drink.
1. excessive drinking of alcohol.
2. an alcoholic drink. See also food and nutrition.
1. an excessive tendency to drink alcoholic beverages.
2. Also called tromomania. delirium tremens.
1. the principles governing the forbidding by law of the manufacture or sale of alcoholic beverages.
2. the interdiction itself. — prohibitionist, n. — Prohibition, n.
a member of the Independent Order of Rechabites, a secret society devoted to total abstention from intoxicating liquors, founded in England in 1835.
the principle or conscious practice of complete abstinence from alcoholic beverages. Also called total abstinence. — teetotaler, n.
delirium tremens. Also called potomania.
the theory or practice of prohibitionism; after the Volstead Act, which implemented U.S. prohibition, introduced by Andrew J. Volstead.
a member of the Washingtonian Society, a temperance society founded in the United States in 1843.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.alcohol - a liquor or brew containing alcohol as the active agentalcohol - a liquor or brew containing alcohol as the active agent; "alcohol (or drink) ruined him"
drug of abuse, street drug - a drug that is taken for nonmedicinal reasons (usually for mind-altering effects); drug abuse can lead to physical and mental damage and (with some substances) dependence and addiction
beverage, drinkable, potable, drink - any liquid suitable for drinking; "may I take your beverage order?"
proof spirit - a mixture containing half alcohol by volume at 60 degrees Fahrenheit
home brew, homebrew - an alcoholic beverage (especially beer) made at home
hooch, hootch - an illicitly distilled (and usually inferior) alcoholic liquor
kava, kavakava - an alcoholic drink made from the aromatic roots of the kava shrub
aperitif - alcoholic beverage taken before a meal as an appetizer
brew, brewage - drink made by steeping and boiling and fermenting rather than distilling
rice beer, sake, saki - Japanese alcoholic beverage made from fermented rice; usually served hot
nipa - made from sap of the Australasian nipa palm
vino, wine - fermented juice (of grapes especially)
booze, hard drink, hard liquor, John Barleycorn, liquor, spirits, strong drink - an alcoholic beverage that is distilled rather than fermented
neutral spirits, ethyl alcohol - nonflavored alcohol of 95 percent or 190 proof used for blending with straight whiskies and in making gin and liqueurs
pulque - fermented Mexican drink from juice of various agave plants especially the maguey
cordial, liqueur - strong highly flavored sweet liquor usually drunk after a meal
mixed drink - made of two or more ingredients
hard cider - alcoholic drink from fermented cider; `cider' and `cyder' are European (especially British) usages for the fermented beverage
perry - a fermented and often effervescent beverage made from juice of pears; similar in taste to hard cider
rotgut - any alcoholic beverage of inferior quality
slug - an amount of an alcoholic drink (usually liquor) that is poured or gulped; "he took a slug of hard liquor"
koumiss, kumis - an alcoholic beverage made from fermented mare's milk; made originally by nomads of central Asia
2.alcohol - any of a series of volatile hydroxyl compounds that are made from hydrocarbons by distillationalcohol - any of a series of volatile hydroxyl compounds that are made from hydrocarbons by distillation
methanol, methyl alcohol, wood alcohol, wood spirit - a light volatile flammable poisonous liquid alcohol; used as an antifreeze and solvent and fuel and as a denaturant for ethyl alcohol
ethanol, ethyl alcohol, fermentation alcohol, grain alcohol - the intoxicating agent in fermented and distilled liquors; used pure or denatured as a solvent or in medicines and colognes and cleaning solutions and rocket fuel; proposed as a renewable clean-burning additive to gasoline
isopropanol, isopropyl alcohol - alcohol used as antifreeze or a solvent
allyl alcohol, propenyl alcohol - an unsaturated primary alcohol present in wood spirit; use to make resins and plasticizers and pharmaceuticals
amyl alcohol - a mixture of 2 or more isomeric alcohols; used as a solvent and in organic synthesis
butanol, butyl alcohol - a flammable alcohol derived from butanes and used for solvents
cyclohexanol - a colorless oily alcohol that smells like camphor
dihydric alcohol, diol, glycol - any of a class of alcohols having 2 hydroxyl groups in each molecule
glycerin, glycerine, glycerol - a sweet syrupy trihydroxy alcohol obtained by saponification of fats and oils
1-dodecanol, lauryl alcohol - a colorless insoluble solid alcohol used to make detergents and pharmaceuticals
liquid - a substance that is liquid at room temperature and pressure
propanol, propyl alcohol - a clear colorless volatile liquid (alcohol) used as a solvent and antiseptic
steroid alcohol, sterol - any of a group of natural steroid alcohols derived from plants or animals; they are waxy insoluble substances

alcohol

noun
1. drink, spirits, liquor, intoxicant, juice (informal), booze (informal), the bottle (informal), grog (informal, chiefly Austral. & N.Z.), the hard stuff (informal), strong drink, Dutch courage (informal), firewater, John Barleycorn, hooch or hootch (informal, chiefly U.S. & Canad.) No alcohol is allowed on the premises.
2. ethanol, ethyl alcohol Products for dry skin have little or no alcohol.
Related words
like dipsomania
see beers, cocktails, liqueurs, spirits, whiskies, wines
Translations
كُحُولالكحولكحول
alkohol
alkohol
alkohol
alkoholi
alkohol
alkohol
alkohol
áfengialkóhól, vínandi
アルコール
알코올
alkoholikasalkoholinisalkoholisalkoholizmassukeltas alkoholio
alkohol
alkohol
alkoholsprit
เหล้า
rượu cồn

alcohol

[ˈælkəhɒl] N (= drink) → alcohol m (also Chem)
I never touch alcoholno pruebo el alcohol, soy abstemio

alcohol

[ˈælkəhɒl]
nalcool m
modif
alcohol consumption, alcohol intake → consommation f d'alcoolalcohol abuse nabus m d'alcoolalcohol abuser nivrogne mfalcohol-free [ˌælkəhɒlˈfriː] adjsans alcool

alcohol

nAlkohol m; alcohol by volumeAlkoholgehalt m

alcohol

[ˈælkəhɒl] nalcool m inv
I never touch alcohol → non bevo (mai) alcolici

alcohol

(ˈӕlkəhol) noun
liquid made by the fermentation or distillation of sugar, present in intoxicating drinks, used also as a fuel, and in thermometers. I never drink alcohol – I drink orange juice.
ˌalcoˈholic adjective
1. of or containing alcohol. Is cider alcoholic?
2. caused by alcohol. an alcoholic stupor.
noun
a person who suffers from a dependence on alcohol.
ˈalcoholism noun
the condition suffered by an alcoholic.

alcohol

كُحُول alkohol alkohol Alkohol οινόπνευμα alcohol alkoholi alcool alkohol alcol アルコール 알코올 alcohol alkohol alkohol álcool алкоголь alkohol เหล้า alkol rượu cồn 酒精

al·co·hol

n. alcohol;
___ detoxificationdetoxificación alcohólica;
___ withdrawal syndromesíndrome de privación alcohólica.

alcohol

n alcohol m, bebidas alcohólicas (incluyendo vino y cerveza); Do you drink alcohol?..¿Toma Ud. bebidas alcohólicas? ¿vino? ¿cerveza?; denatured — alcohol desnaturalizado; rubbing — alcohol para fricciones, alcohol para frotar
References in classic literature ?
He kept an alcohol lamp in his room, and a French coffee-pot, and his wife made coffee for him at any hour of the night he happened to want it.
She has not taken a drop, but every one else there is literally burning alcohol, as the lamps are burning oil; some of the men who are sound asleep in their chairs or on the floor are reeking of it so that you cannot go near them.
He shied his helmet into the corner, and in half a minute he had a new wick in the alcohol lamp and was firing up on the croup-kettle.
He tried to draw me into a discussion about alcohol, professing to have saved my life with it.
I can recognize the flavor of the alcohol in which it has been dissolved.
They succeeded in rendering Roderick insensible; but, placing their hands upon his breast, they were inexpressibly horror stricken to feel the monster wriggling, twining, and darting to and fro within his narrow limits, evidently enlivened by the opium or alcohol, and incited to unusual feats of activity.
Then these children of the open air, whom even excess of alcohol could scarce injure permanently, betook themselves to the field-path; and as they went there moved onward with them, around the shadow of each one's head, a circle of opalized light, formed by the moon's rays upon the glistening sheet of dew.
I have been informed since, by various eminent medical gentlemen, that the alcohol must have entirely counteracted the effects of the chalybeate properties contained in the water.
He was in fact very drunk, but as he had not taken more than one glass of beer, it could have been due only to a more dangerous intoxicant than alcohol.
But at any time such a village would be liable to a raid of Asiatics or Africans or such-like air-pirates, demanding petrol and alcohol or provisions.
And after brandy, taken in sufficient quantity, it says, "Now, come, fool, grin and tumble, that your fellow-men may laugh - drivel in folly, and splutter in senseless sounds, and show what a helpless ninny is poor man whose wit and will are drowned, like kittens, side by side, in half an inch of alcohol.
There was no one in the anteroom; empty bottles, cloaks, and overshoes were lying about; there was a smell of alcohol, and sounds of voices and shouting in the distance.