alderman


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al·der·man

 (ôl′dər-mən)
n.
1. A member of the municipal legislative body in a town or city in many jurisdictions.
2. A member of the higher branch of the municipal or borough council in England and Ireland before 1974.
3.
a. A noble of high rank or authority in Anglo-Saxon England.
b. The chief officer of a shire in Anglo-Saxon England.

[Middle English, a person of high rank, from Old English ealdorman : ealdor, elder, chief (from eald, old; see al- in Indo-European roots) + man, man; see man.]

al′der·man·cy (-sē) n.
al′der·man′ic (-măn′ĭk) adj.

alderman

(ˈɔːldəmən)
n, pl -men
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) (in England and Wales until 1974) one of the senior members of a local council, elected by other councillors
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) (in the US, Canada, Australia, etc) a member of the governing body of a municipality
3. (Historical Terms) history a variant spelling of ealdorman
Abbreviations (for senses 1, 2): Ald or Aldm
[Old English aldormann, from ealdor chief (comparative of eald old) + mann man]
aldermanic adj
ˈaldermanry n
ˈaldermanˌship n

al•der•man

(ˈɔl dər mən)

n., pl. -men.
1. (in the U.S., Canada, and Australia) a member of a municipal legislative body, esp. of a municipal council.
2. (in England) one of the members, chosen by the elected councilors, in a borough or county council.
3. (in medieval England)
a. a chief.
b. (later) the chief magistrate of a county or group of counties.
[before 900; Old English (e)aldormann=ealdor chief, patriarch (eald old + -or n. suffix) + mann man]
al`der•man′ic (-ˈmæn ɪk) adj.
usage: See -man.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.alderman - a member of a municipal legislative body (as a city council)alderman - a member of a municipal legislative body (as a city council); "aldermen usually represent city wards"
representative - a person who represents others
Translations

alderman

[ˈɔːldəmən] N (aldermen (pl)) → concejal(a) m/f (de categoría superior)

alderman

n pl <-men> → Alderman m (Ratsherr)

alderman

[ˈɔːldəmən] n (-men (pl)) → consigliere m comunale
References in classic literature ?
This is a description of animal food, Alderman,' said Filer, making little punches in it with a pencil-case, 'commonly known to the labouring population of this country, by the name of tripe.
I SEE quite a number of rings on your tail," said an Alderman to a Raccoon that he met in a zoological garden.
There were Master Loys Roelof, alderman of the city of Louvain; Messire Clays d'Etuelde, alderman of Brussels; Messire Paul de Baeust, Sieur de Voirmizelle, President of Flanders; Master Jehan Coleghens, burgomaster of the city of Antwerp; Master George de la Moere, first alderman of the kuere of the city of Ghent; Master Gheldolf van der Hage, first alderman of the
Sir knight," said he, "my name is David Micheldene, and I am a burgher and alderman of the good town of Norwich, where I live five doors from the church of Our Lady, as all men know on the banks of Yare.
Alderman Ptolemy Tortoise brought a salad with him in a string bag.
Immediately the alderman, clothed in their cloth robes and preceded by six sergeants, each holding a FLAMBEAU in his hand, went to attend upon the king, whom they met on the steps, where the provost of the merchants made him the speech of welcome--a compliment to which his Majesty replied with an apology for coming so late, laying the blame upon the cardinal, who had detained him till eleven o'clock, talking of affairs of state.
I told you yesterday, sir,' said the Lord Mayor, 'that you might have an alderman in your house, if you could get one to come.
Alderman, and turning to the fellow that stopped me, he asked him if it was true that I knocked with my foot?
Dobbin, the despised grocer, was Alderman Dobbin--Alderman Dobbin was Colonel of the City Light Horse, then burning with military ardour to resist the French Invasion.
The tortoise--as the alderman of Bristol, well learned in eating, knows by much experience--besides the delicious calipash and calipee, contains many different kinds of food; nor can the learned reader be ignorant, that in human nature, though here collected under one general name, is such prodigious variety, that a cook will have sooner gone through all the several species of animal and vegetable food in the world, than an author will be able to exhaust so extensive a subject.
If he does not, some one else will; and the saloon-keeper, unless he is also an alderman, is apt to be in debt to the big brewers, and on the verge of being sold out.
One of these seats was at present occupied by Cedric the Saxon, who, though but in rank a thane, or, as the Normans called him, a Franklin, felt, at the delay of his evening meal, an irritable impatience, which might have become an alderman, whether of ancient or of modern times.