ale


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ale

 (āl)
n.
1. A usually full-bodied beer that has been fermented at a relatively warm temperature.
2. A serving of this beer.

[Middle English, from Old English ealu, alu; see alu- in Indo-European roots.]

ale

(eɪl)
n
1. (Brewing) a beer fermented in an open vessel using yeasts that rise to the top of the brew. Compare beer, lager1
2. (Brewing) (formerly) an alcoholic drink made by fermenting a cereal, esp barley, but differing from beer by being unflavoured by hops
3. (Brewing) chiefly Brit another word for beer
[Old English alu, ealu; related to Old Norse öl, Old Saxon alofat]

ale

(eɪl)

n.
a malt beverage, darker, heavier, and more bitter than beer.
[before 950; Middle English; Old English (e)alu (genitive ealoth), c. Old Saxon alo-, Old Norse ǫl]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ale - a general name for beer made with a top fermenting yeastale - a general name for beer made with a top fermenting yeast; in some of the United States an ale is (by law) a brew of more than 4% alcohol by volume
beer - a general name for alcoholic beverages made by fermenting a cereal (or mixture of cereals) flavored with hops
Weissbier, wheat beer, white beer - a general name for beers made from wheat by top fermentation; usually very pale and cloudy and effervescent
bitter - English term for a dry sharp-tasting ale with strong flavor of hops (usually on draft)
Burton - a strong dark English ale
pale ale - an amber colored ale brewed with pale malts; similar to bitter but drier and lighter
porter's beer, porter - a very dark sweet ale brewed from roasted unmalted barley
stout - a strong very dark heavy-bodied ale made from pale malt and roasted unmalted barley and (often) caramel malt with hops
Translations
شِرَاب مِن نَوع الجَعَه
ale``pivo
øl
öl, bjór
šviesusis alus
alusgaišais alus
pivo
pivo

ale

[eɪl] Ncerveza f
see also brown E
see also light 2 D
see also pale 1 C

ale

[ˈeɪl] nbière f

ale

n (old)Ale nt ? real ale

ale

[eɪl] nbirra

ale

(eil) noun
the name given to certain kinds of beer. two pints of ale.
References in classic literature ?
John says I musn't lose my strength, and has me take cod liver oil and lots of tonics and things, to say nothing of ale and wine and rare meat.
Higginson, and the outpouring of a psalm from the general throat of the community, was to be made acceptable to the grosser sense by ale, cider, wine, and brandy, in copious effusion, and, as some authorities aver, by an ox, roasted whole, or at least, by the weight and substance of an ox, in more manageable joints and sirloins.
They were her countrywomen: and the beef and ale of their native land, with a moral diet not a whit more refined, entered largely into their composition.
Transported to the Indies, his live blood would not spoil like bottled ale.
Now when these poor sun-burnt mariners, bare-footed, and with their trowsers rolled high up on their eely legs, had wearily hauled their fat fish high and dry, promising themselves a good 150 pounds from the precious oil and bone; and in fantasy sipping rare tea with their wives, and good ale with their cronies, upon the strength of their respective shares; up steps a very learned and most Christian and charitable gentleman, with a copy of Blackstone under his arm; and laying it upon the whale's head, he says -- Hands off
Such an individual seated in his arm-chair, his mug of ale frothing on the round table before him, is to be seen in any circuit of five or six miles among these hills, if you go at the right time after dinner.
Carrots and gooseberry tart -- pease-pudding and plenty of fat -- pork and beef and mutton, and cut 'em all, and quick about it -- stout for one, and ale for t'other -- and stale bread here, and new bread there -- and this gentleman likes cheese, and that gentleman doesn't -- Matilda, Tilda, Tilda, Tilda, fifty times over, till I didn't know my own name again -- oh lord
He came in here,' said the waiter, looking at the light through the tumbler, 'ordered a glass of this ale - WOULD order it - I told him not - drank it, and fell dead.
I promised myself that I would do something for them one of these days, and formed a plan in outline for bestowing a dinner of roast-beef and plumpudding, a pint of ale, and a gallon of condescension, upon everybody in the village.
The fading grey light fell dimly on the walls decorated with guns, whips, and foxes' brushes, on coats and hats flung on the chairs, on tankards sending forth a scent of flat ale, and on a half-choked fire, with pipes propped up in the chimney-corners: signs of a domestic life destitute of any hallowing charm, with which the look of gloomy vexation on Godfrey's blond face was in sad accordance.
Yet he had, he said, been too busy all his life to spend much time in public- houses, as we drank a pint of ale together in the inn which stood at the end of the common.
Besides these subjects of anxiety, the Saxon thane was impatient for the presence of his favourite clown Wamba, whose jests, such as they were, served for a sort of seasoning to his evening meal, and to the deep draughts of ale and wine with which he was in the habit of accompanying it.