alewife


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ale·wife 1

 (āl′wīf′)
n. pl. ale·wives (-wīvz′)
A fish (Alosa pseudoharengus) of North American Atlantic waters and some inland lakes, which swims up rivers to spawn.

[Originally North American English, probably from alteration (influenced by alewife, because the fish's relatively big belly distinguishes it from the herring) of obsolete English aloes, allowes, a type of shad (Alosa alosa), from French alose, shad, from Old French, from Late Latin alausa, of Gaulish origin.]

ale·wife 2

 (āl′wīf′)
n. pl. ale·wives (-wīvz′)
A woman who keeps an alehouse.

alewife

(ˈeɪlˌwaɪf)
n, pl -wives
(Animals) a North American fish, Pomolobus pseudoharengus, similar to the herring Clupea harengus: family Clupeidae (herrings)
[C19: perhaps an alteration (through influence of alewife, that is, a large rotund woman, alluding to the fish's shape) of French alose shad]

ale•wife1

(ˈeɪlˌwaɪf)

n., pl. -wives.
a North American fish, Alosa pseudoharengus, similar to a shad.
[1625–35, Amer.; earlier allowes, perhaps influenced by alewife2, probably < French alose shad < Gallo-Latin alausa]

ale•wife2

(ˈeɪlˌwaɪf)

n., pl. -wives.
a woman who owns or operates an alehouse.
[1350–1400]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.alewife - flesh of shad-like fish abundant along the Atlantic coast or in coastal streamsalewife - flesh of shad-like fish abundant along the Atlantic coast or in coastal streams
Alosa pseudoharengus, Pomolobus pseudoharengus, alewife - shad-like food fish that runs rivers to spawn; often salted or smoked; sometimes placed in genus Pomolobus
fish - the flesh of fish used as food; "in Japan most fish is eaten raw"; "after the scare about foot-and-mouth disease a lot of people started eating fish instead of meat"; "they have a chef who specializes in fish"
2.alewife - shad-like food fish that runs rivers to spawnalewife - shad-like food fish that runs rivers to spawn; often salted or smoked; sometimes placed in genus Pomolobus
clupeid, clupeid fish - any of numerous soft-finned schooling food fishes of shallow waters of northern seas
alewife - flesh of shad-like fish abundant along the Atlantic coast or in coastal streams
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
the combined sewer overflows to the Alewife Brook will be reduced by 84 percent or 43.
The Roanoke River fishery, once dominated by thriving commercial fisheries that targeted anadromous species American Shad, Alewife, Blueback Herring, and Striped Bass, is now a multimillion-dollar recreational fishery best known for Striped Bass and Hickory Shad (McCargo et al.
10140), 2010 WL 8471747, at *3-4 (noting group met at Alewife station).
1976) observed critical thermal maximum in the alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus) and noted no effect of age (and presumably size).
Seven species are introduced in the Chicago region: Common Carp (Cyprinus carpio), Alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus), Goldfish (Carassius auratus), Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytseha), Redear Sunfish (Lepomis microlophus), White Perch (Morone americana), and Round Goby (Neogobius melanostomus), but many others owe their presence in Wolf Lake to human intervention.
When Christ successfully completes his redemptive mission, Satan is allowed to keep the soul of an alewife.
Alewife Alnager Armourer Baker Barber Brewer Cobbler Dragoman Fish-fag Hangman Lavender Mercer Midwife Minstrel Scrivener Sempster Smith Tapster Tinker Wakeman
In turn, Diporeia was fed upon by many fish species, including the commercially important lake whitefish, and forage fish such as alewife, bloater, and sculpin that serve as prey for larger piscivores (salmon, trout) (Scott and Crossman 1973, Wells 1980).
That contrasted with an alewife who was based in Foregate Street, an area of the town filled with drinking establishments - in the late 1480s, there were 21 brewers and 33 places that sold ale.
The emerald shiner, once extremely abundant in the Great Lakes, but now reduced in number dramatically, attributed to competition with the alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus), has been spread inland by stocking and angler releases of bait fish.
Another asset is the Minuteman Bikeway--the Nation's 500th rail-trail--that stretches from the Alewife neighborhood 17.
Ross and Dunning (1996) used 190 dB high frequency (122-128 kHz) broad-based sound, and reduced alewife abundance by 51% at power plant intakes in Lake Ontario.