alewife


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ale·wife 1

 (āl′wīf′)
n. pl. ale·wives (-wīvz′)
A fish (Alosa pseudoharengus) of North American Atlantic waters and some inland lakes, which swims up rivers to spawn.

[Originally North American English, probably from alteration (influenced by alewife, because the fish's relatively big belly distinguishes it from the herring) of obsolete English aloes, allowes, a type of shad (Alosa alosa), from French alose, shad, from Old French, from Late Latin alausa, of Gaulish origin.]

ale·wife 2

 (āl′wīf′)
n. pl. ale·wives (-wīvz′)
A woman who keeps an alehouse.

alewife

(ˈeɪlˌwaɪf)
n, pl -wives
(Animals) a North American fish, Pomolobus pseudoharengus, similar to the herring Clupea harengus: family Clupeidae (herrings)
[C19: perhaps an alteration (through influence of alewife, that is, a large rotund woman, alluding to the fish's shape) of French alose shad]

ale•wife1

(ˈeɪlˌwaɪf)

n., pl. -wives.
a North American fish, Alosa pseudoharengus, similar to a shad.
[1625–35, Amer.; earlier allowes, perhaps influenced by alewife2, probably < French alose shad < Gallo-Latin alausa]

ale•wife2

(ˈeɪlˌwaɪf)

n., pl. -wives.
a woman who owns or operates an alehouse.
[1350–1400]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.alewife - flesh of shad-like fish abundant along the Atlantic coast or in coastal streamsalewife - flesh of shad-like fish abundant along the Atlantic coast or in coastal streams
Alosa pseudoharengus, Pomolobus pseudoharengus, alewife - shad-like food fish that runs rivers to spawn; often salted or smoked; sometimes placed in genus Pomolobus
fish - the flesh of fish used as food; "in Japan most fish is eaten raw"; "after the scare about foot-and-mouth disease a lot of people started eating fish instead of meat"; "they have a chef who specializes in fish"
2.alewife - shad-like food fish that runs rivers to spawnalewife - shad-like food fish that runs rivers to spawn; often salted or smoked; sometimes placed in genus Pomolobus
clupeid, clupeid fish - any of numerous soft-finned schooling food fishes of shallow waters of northern seas
alewife - flesh of shad-like fish abundant along the Atlantic coast or in coastal streams
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
Speakers will include Ben Pullen, co-founder of Global EVRT, and Sam Alewife, CEO of Green Parking.
The study also found that lake trout and steelhead may fare better because these two species can switch from eating alewife, which are in decline, to bottom-dwelling round goby, another newly established invasive prey fish that feeds on quagga mussels.
But post-spawn walleyes moving to Lake Huron to feed makes little sense since the alewife population crashed and food for big walleyes is scarce.
Also, in their discussion of the unique episode of the damned Alewife in the Harrowing of Hell, the authors muse about whether 'since .
But a handful of others-sea lamprey, alewife, round goby, quagga mussel, zebra mussel, Eurasian watermilfoil, spiny water flea, and rusty crayfish-have conducted an all-out assault on the Great Lakes and are winning the battle.
So DEC biologists stocked Pacific salmon, steelhead and brown trout to control alewife numbers and to provide outstanding fishing opportunities.
The professor rolled his eyes when the word was uttered, surely signaling a folder of insufferable alewife poems sitting on top of a cabinet, the typed pages chortled over during tweedy faculty meetings.
Diet overlap of non-native alewife and native yellow perch and spottail shiner in nearshore waters of southwestern Lake Michigan, 2000-2007.
Drifting almost any live menhaden, alewife, cigar minnow, Spanish sardine or a blue runner can be really effective.
Struzziery was chosen for his leadership of the Alewife Stormwater Wetland Project in Cambridge, MA, a public project lauded for applying natural, sustainable techniques to resolve a significant combined sewer overflow problem while restoring the area's natural hydrology, protecting and enhancing the local ecosystem, and creating new recreational and educational features for the community.
In response to concerns that the growing alewife population was harmful to smallmouth bass, the State of Maine ordered the closure of fishways on the Maine side of the river.
Examples of reconstructions that have worked include a multiacre wetland behind the MBTA Alewife station at the Arlington/Cambridge border, and the area behind ForeKicks, a soccer complex, in Taunton.