alewife

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ale·wife 1

 (āl′wīf′)
n. pl. ale·wives (-wīvz′)
A fish (Alosa pseudoharengus) of North American Atlantic waters and some inland lakes, which swims up rivers to spawn.

[Originally North American English, probably from alteration (influenced by alewife, because the fish's relatively big belly distinguishes it from the herring) of obsolete English aloes, allowes, a type of shad (Alosa alosa), from French alose, shad, from Old French, from Late Latin alausa, of Gaulish origin.]

ale·wife 2

 (āl′wīf′)
n. pl. ale·wives (-wīvz′)
A woman who keeps an alehouse.

alewife

(ˈeɪlˌwaɪf)
n, pl -wives
(Animals) a North American fish, Pomolobus pseudoharengus, similar to the herring Clupea harengus: family Clupeidae (herrings)
[C19: perhaps an alteration (through influence of alewife, that is, a large rotund woman, alluding to the fish's shape) of French alose shad]

ale•wife1

(ˈeɪlˌwaɪf)

n., pl. -wives.
a North American fish, Alosa pseudoharengus, similar to a shad.
[1625–35, Amer.; earlier allowes, perhaps influenced by alewife2, probably < French alose shad < Gallo-Latin alausa]

ale•wife2

(ˈeɪlˌwaɪf)

n., pl. -wives.
a woman who owns or operates an alehouse.
[1350–1400]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.alewife - flesh of shad-like fish abundant along the Atlantic coast or in coastal streamsalewife - flesh of shad-like fish abundant along the Atlantic coast or in coastal streams
Alosa pseudoharengus, Pomolobus pseudoharengus, alewife - shad-like food fish that runs rivers to spawn; often salted or smoked; sometimes placed in genus Pomolobus
fish - the flesh of fish used as food; "in Japan most fish is eaten raw"; "after the scare about foot-and-mouth disease a lot of people started eating fish instead of meat"; "they have a chef who specializes in fish"
2.alewife - shad-like food fish that runs rivers to spawnalewife - shad-like food fish that runs rivers to spawn; often salted or smoked; sometimes placed in genus Pomolobus
clupeid, clupeid fish - any of numerous soft-finned schooling food fishes of shallow waters of northern seas
alewife - flesh of shad-like fish abundant along the Atlantic coast or in coastal streams
Translations
References in classic literature ?
But of my own knowledge, I know that down to the year sharks and shad, alewives and herring, against Linnaeus's express edict, were still found dividing the possession of the same seas with the Leviathan.
Early visitors to these shores describe rivers choked with migrating salmon and alewives.
Following the water odyssey of a matron fish named Pesca, a school of alewives make their way to a freshwater lake named Lily Lake to spawn, laying their eggs on the bottom.
alewives and bluebackeds, have plummeted in recent years and most runs have been closed to netting, their cousin, the Atlantic herring, has made a resurgence in our region, once again providing big commercial catches.
A likely explanation is that diadromous fish, such as shad, alewives, salmonids or eels, were processed in these vessels.
In The Alewives Imitation to Married-Men, a young toper laments that the hostess who once encouraged him, 'come when thou wilt boy, thou art welcome to me', now responds to his plea for credit, 'I'll not lend you a penny, if 'twould save your life'.
Designed to establish timely and effective fish passage specifically for fish species such as blue-black herring, alewives, shad and other native species, the capacity of the new fishway is anticipated to enable up to 200,000 river herring and 20,000 shad to pass up the river annually.
Alewives, pinfish, shrimp, or even cut bait will be eaten.
Despite differences in the hydrographic conditions and prey available to larvae in the Patuxent River, the abundances of juvenile striped bass, white perch, and alewives in the summers of 2000 and 2001, based on monitoring surveys conducted by Maryland Department of Natural Resources (http://www.
Alewives first entered Lake Michigan in 1949 (Woods 1960) and were reported in Wolf Lake from the 1960s to the 1980s, which corresponds to their peak numbers in Lake Michigan (Laird & Page 1996).
The beer historian Alan Eames wrote that most of the women burned for witchcraft in Europe were brewsters or alewives.
HABITS AND HABITAT: With the exception of the spawning period, alewives typically inhabit open water.