Algerine


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Related to Algerine: Algerine War

Algerine

(ˌældʒəˈriːn)
adj
(Placename) of or relating to Algeria or its inhabitants
n
(Peoples) a native or inhabitant of Algeria

algerine

(ˌældʒəˈriːn)
n
(Clothing & Fashion) a soft striped woollen cloth
[C19: from French, from algérien Algerian: because the cloth was originally made in Algeria]
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References in classic literature ?
It must be some Algerine corsair brigantine that the watchtower signals to us.
towards the island of Formosa, as much afraid of being seen by a Dutch or English merchant ship as a Dutch or English merchant ship in the Mediterranean is of an Algerine man- of-war.
One was taken by the Algerines, and the other was lost on the Start, near Torbay, and all the people drowned except three; so that in either of those vessels I had been made miserable.
He discusses the application of political and aesthetic approaches to the study of early American novels, focusing on Hugh Henry Brackenridge's Modern Chivalry; the deceptive actions of picaresque con men, gothic villains, and sentimental seducers in early American novels, such as Charles Brockden Brown's Wieland and Arthur Mervyn; Susanna Rowson's Charlotte Temple, Royall Tyler's The Algerine Captive, and Tabitha Gilman Tenney's Female Quixotism; the visual arts, including Charles Wilson Peale and Raphaelle Peale's trompe l'oeil deception; and artistic negotiations of deception, sensuous cognition, and art in Susan Warner's The Wide, Wide World, Nathaniel Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter, and Herman Melville's Moby-Dick.
At about the same time, he became enraged by Nathan Coen Sallal, who, according to Eaton, had suggested that, "being an Algerine Jew, he was the master of the American consul in Tunis.
The following can be noted from these examples: (1) A PDP can be taken directly from text (example PDP 3 is taken from Vera Brittain's autobiography Testament of Youth) or may be modified (examples PDP 1, 2, and 4 are modified slightly from the novels Little Women, Tom Swift and His Airship, and The Pirate City: An Algerine Tale).
Cathy Davidson, for example, includes a chapter on "The Picaresque and the Margins of Political Discourse" in Revolution and the Word that discusses, among others, Female Quixotism, Modern Chivalry, and Royall Tyler's The Algerine Captive (1797) as representations of the American picaresque; yet despite Davidson's adept and justifiably influential readings, none of the protagonists in these novels is a picaro, a lowlife struggling to the top.
The President was further granted the discretionary authority to grant special commissions to "owners of private armed vessels of the United States," to permit them to lawfully subdue, seize, and capture "any Algerine vessel, goods or effects" with the same authority as U.
It refers to such representative literary works as Royall Tyler's Algerine Captive (1797), Edgar Allan Poe's "Al Aaraaf" (1829), Omar Ibn Said's "Life" (1831), Herman Melville's Moby-Dick (1851), W.
See, for example, as typical of anti-piracy propaganda, William Hone's anonymous Cruelties of the Algerine Pirates (London: Hone, 1816).
Their bill called for "a naval force, to consist of four ships of 44, and two ships of 20 guns each, be provided for the protection of the commerce of the United States against Algerine cruisers.