alienate


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

al·ien·ate

 (āl′yə-nāt′, ā′lē-ə-)
tr.v. al·ien·at·ed, al·ien·at·ing, al·ien·ates
1. To cause to become unfriendly or hostile; estrange: alienate a friend; alienate potential supporters by taking extreme positions.
2. To cause to become withdrawn or unresponsive; isolate or dissociate emotionally: The numbing labor tended to alienate workers.
3. To cause to be transferred; turn away: "He succeeded ... in alienating the affections of my only ward" (Oscar Wilde).
4. Law To transfer (property or a right) to the ownership of another, especially by an act of the owner rather than by inheritance.

[Latin aliēnāre, aliēnāt-, from Latin aliēnus, alien; see alien.]

al′ien·a′tor n.

alienate

(ˈeɪljəˌneɪt; ˈeɪlɪə-)
vb (tr)
1. to cause (a friend, sympathizer, etc) to become indifferent, unfriendly, or hostile; estrange
2. to turn away; divert: to alienate the affections of a person.
3. (Law) law to transfer the ownership of (property, title, etc) to another person
ˈalienˌator n

al•ien•ate

(ˈeɪl yəˌneɪt, ˈeɪ li ə-)

v.t. -at•ed, -at•ing.
1. to turn away the affection of; make indifferent or hostile: He has alienated most of his friends.
2. to transfer or divert: to alienate funds from their intended purpose.
3. Law. to convey (title, property, etc.) to another: to alienate lands.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Latin aliēnātus, past participle of aliēnāre, derivative of aliēnus alien]
al′ien•a`tor, n.
syn: See estrange.

alienate


Past participle: alienated
Gerund: alienating

Imperative
alienate
alienate
Present
I alienate
you alienate
he/she/it alienates
we alienate
you alienate
they alienate
Preterite
I alienated
you alienated
he/she/it alienated
we alienated
you alienated
they alienated
Present Continuous
I am alienating
you are alienating
he/she/it is alienating
we are alienating
you are alienating
they are alienating
Present Perfect
I have alienated
you have alienated
he/she/it has alienated
we have alienated
you have alienated
they have alienated
Past Continuous
I was alienating
you were alienating
he/she/it was alienating
we were alienating
you were alienating
they were alienating
Past Perfect
I had alienated
you had alienated
he/she/it had alienated
we had alienated
you had alienated
they had alienated
Future
I will alienate
you will alienate
he/she/it will alienate
we will alienate
you will alienate
they will alienate
Future Perfect
I will have alienated
you will have alienated
he/she/it will have alienated
we will have alienated
you will have alienated
they will have alienated
Future Continuous
I will be alienating
you will be alienating
he/she/it will be alienating
we will be alienating
you will be alienating
they will be alienating
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been alienating
you have been alienating
he/she/it has been alienating
we have been alienating
you have been alienating
they have been alienating
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been alienating
you will have been alienating
he/she/it will have been alienating
we will have been alienating
you will have been alienating
they will have been alienating
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been alienating
you had been alienating
he/she/it had been alienating
we had been alienating
you had been alienating
they had been alienating
Conditional
I would alienate
you would alienate
he/she/it would alienate
we would alienate
you would alienate
they would alienate
Past Conditional
I would have alienated
you would have alienated
he/she/it would have alienated
we would have alienated
you would have alienated
they would have alienated
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.alienate - arouse hostility or indifference in where there had formerly been love, affection, or friendlinessalienate - arouse hostility or indifference in where there had formerly been love, affection, or friendliness; "She alienated her friends when she became fanatically religious"
alter, change, modify - cause to change; make different; cause a transformation; "The advent of the automobile may have altered the growth pattern of the city"; "The discussion has changed my thinking about the issue"
drift apart, drift away - lose personal contact over time; "The two women, who had been roommates in college, drifted apart after they got married"
wean - detach the affections of
2.alienate - transfer property or ownershipalienate - transfer property or ownership; "The will aliened the property to the heirs"
transfer - cause to change ownership; "I transferred my stock holdings to my children"
3.alienate - make withdrawn or isolated or emotionally dissociated; "the boring work alienated his employees"
impress, strike, affect, move - have an emotional or cognitive impact upon; "This child impressed me as unusually mature"; "This behavior struck me as odd"

alienate

verb antagonize, anger, annoy, offend, irritate, hassle (informal), gall, repel, estrange, piss off (taboo slang), lose the affection of, disaffect The government cannot afford to alienate either group.
alienate someone from something estrange, separate, divide, divorce, divert, break off, set against, disunite, part, drive apart, make hostile, disaffect, set at odds, make unfriendly His ex-wife was determined to alienate him from his two boys.

alienate

verb
1. To make distant, hostile, or unsympathetic:
Idiom: set at odds.
2. Law. To change the ownership of (property) by means of a legal document:
Translations
يُنَفِّر، يُغَرِّب، يَوجِد القَطِيعَه
odcizit se
fremmedgøre
elidegenít
gera fráhverfan
odcudziť sa
kendinden soğutmak

alienate

[ˈeɪlɪəneɪt] VT
1. (= offend) [+ person] → ofender; [+ sb's sympathies] → perder, enajenar (frm)
to alienate o.s. from sbalejarse or apartarse de algn
2. (Pol, Philos) → alienar, enajenar
3. (Jur) → enajenar

alienate

[ˈeɪliəneɪt] vt [issue, problem] → écarter; [person] → s'aliéner
She has alienated all her friends → Elle s'est aliéné tous ses amis.
to alienate sb from sb/sth → aliéner qn de qn/qch
to alienate o.s. → s'aliéner
to alienate o.s. from sb/sth → s'aliéner de qn/qch

alienate

vt
peoplebefremden; affectionszerstören, sich (dat)verscherzen; public opiniongegen sich aufbringen; to alienate oneself from somebody/somethingsich jdm/einer Sache entfremden; Brecht set out to alienate his audienceBrecht wollte, dass sich die Zuschauer distanzieren
(Jur) property, moneyübertragen

alienate

[ˈeɪlɪəneɪt] vtalienare
her behaviour has alienated her friends → il suo comportamento ha fatto allontanare gli amici

alien

(ˈeiliən) adjective
foreign. alien customs.
noun
1. a foreigner. Aliens are not welcome there.
2. a creature from another planet. aliens from outer space; He claims that he was abducted by aliens.
ˈalienate (-neit) verb
to make someone feel unfriendly to one. He alienated his wife by his cruelty to her.
ˌalieˈnation noun
References in classic literature ?
We must affect our country as our parents, And if at any time we alienate Out love or industry from doing it honor, We must respect effects and teach the soul Matter of conscience and religion, And not desire of rule or benefit.
In addition to the dread that, having led up to so much mischief, it would be now more likely than ever to alienate Joe from me if he believed it, I had a further restraining dread that he would not believe it, but would assort it with the fabulous dogs and veal-cutlets as a monstrous invention.
Let me hasten to add," continued he, "that the testator, having only the right to alienate a part of his fortune, and having alienated it all, the will will not bear scrutiny, and is declared null and void.
These princes alone have states and do not defend them; and they have subjects and do not rule them; and the states, although unguarded, are not taken from them, and the subjects, although not ruled, do not care, and they have neither the desire nor the ability to alienate themselves.
He had partaken of the homely abundance of their tables, had quaffed the far-famed Shaker cider, and had joined in the sacred dance, every step of which is believed to alienate the enthusiast from earth, and bear him onward to heavenly purity and bliss.
He had been walking for some time, when, directly in front of him, borne back by the summer breeze, he heard a few words uttered in that bright Parisian idiom from which his ears had begun to alienate themselves.
I had forfeited love, I had sacrificed honor, and now I must deliberately alienate myself from the one being whose society might yet be some recompense for all that I had lost.
But though he did everything to alienate the sympathy of other boys he longed with all his heart for the popularity which to some was so easily accorded.
I do not think this would be true, because the Negro is a much stronger and wiser man than he was thirty-five years ago, and he is fast learning the lesson that he cannot afford to act in a manner that will alienate his Southern white neighbours from him.
49b: Hesiod in the "Marriage of Ceyx" -- for though grammar-school boys alienate it from the poet, yet I consider the poem ancient
We must affect our country as our parents, And if at any time we alienate Our love or industry from doing it honor, We must respect effects and teach the soul Matter of conscience and religion, And not desire of rule or benefit.