alienation


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Related to alienation: Parental alienation

al·ien·a·tion

 (āl′yə-nā′shən, ā′lē-ə-)
n.
1. The act of alienating or the condition of being alienated; estrangement: Alcoholism often leads to the alienation of family and friends.
2. Emotional isolation or dissociation.
3. Law The act of transferring property or title to it to another.

alienation

(ˌeɪljəˈneɪʃən; ˌeɪlɪə-)
n
1. a turning away; estrangement
2. the state of being an outsider or the feeling of being isolated, as from society
3. (Psychiatry) psychiatry a state in which a person's feelings are inhibited so that eventually both the self and the external world seem unreal
4. (Law) law
a. the transfer of property, as by conveyance or will, into the ownership of another
b. the right of an owner to dispose of his property

al•ien•a•tion

(ˌeɪl yəˈneɪ ʃən, ˌeɪ li ə-)

n.
1. the act of alienating; the state of being alienated.
2. Law. a transfer of the title to property by one person to another; conveyance.
3. the state of being withdrawn from the objective world.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin]
al′ien•a`tive, adj.

alienation

abalienation.
See also: Separation

alienation


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1. A concept first introduced by Marx and since used in a variety of contexts. Loosely defined, it means the separation of the individual from important aspects of the external world accompanied by a feeling of powerlessness or lack of control. A person may feel alienated from themselves or from society.
2. A state in which a person feels detached from the outside world and sometimes from his or her own feelings.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.alienation - the feeling of being alienated from other peoplealienation - the feeling of being alienated from other people
dislike - a feeling of aversion or antipathy; "my dislike of him was instinctive"
isolation - a feeling of being disliked and alone
2.alienation - separation resulting from hostilityalienation - separation resulting from hostility
isolation - a state of separation between persons or groups
3.alienation - (law) the voluntary and absolute transfer of title and possession of real property from one person to anotheralienation - (law) the voluntary and absolute transfer of title and possession of real property from one person to another; "the power of alienation is an essential ingredient of ownership"
transference, transfer - transferring ownership
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
4.alienation - the action of alienatingalienation - the action of alienating; the action of causing to become unfriendly; "his behavior alienated the other students"
action - something done (usually as opposed to something said); "there were stories of murders and other unnatural actions"

alienation

alienation

noun
1. The act of estranging or the condition of being estranged:
2. An interruption in friendly relations:
3. Psychology. Serious mental illness or disorder impairing a person's capacity to function normally and safely:
Psychiatry: mania.
Psychology: aberration.
4. Law. A making over of legal ownership or title:
Translations
تَباعُد، جَفَاء، تَغْرِيب
odcizení
frastødelsefremmedgørelse
AbalienationEntfremdung
alijenacija
elidegenítés
fráhverfing, firring
odcudzenie
yabancılaşma

alienation

[ˌeɪlɪəˈneɪʃən] N
1. (Pol, Philos) → alienación f, enajenación f
feelings of alienation (from society)sentimientos mpl de alienación or enajenación (social)
2. (= estrangement) [of friend] → alejamiento m
3. (Jur) → enajenación f, traspaso m
4. (Med) → enajenación f mental

alienation

[ˌeɪliəˈneɪʃən] naliénation f

alienation

n
Entfremdung f(from von); (Theat) → Distanzierung f; alienation effectVerfremdungseffekt m; alienation of affections (Jur) → Entfremdung f
(Jur, of property) → Übertragung f
(Psych) → Alienation f

alienation

[ˌeɪlɪəˈneɪʃn] nalienazione f

alien

(ˈeiliən) adjective
foreign. alien customs.
noun
1. a foreigner. Aliens are not welcome there.
2. a creature from another planet. aliens from outer space; He claims that he was abducted by aliens.
ˈalienate (-neit) verb
to make someone feel unfriendly to one. He alienated his wife by his cruelty to her.
ˌalieˈnation noun

a·li·en·a·tion

n. separación;
ofuscación.

alienation

n (psych) alienación f, aislamiento emocional
References in classic literature ?
Among his actual auditors, however, it merely gave him an additional claim to that respect which they never withhold from such as are believed to be the subjects of mental alienation.
Its result, on earth, could hardly fail to be insanity, and hereafter, that eternal alienation from the Good and True, of which madness is perhaps the earthly type.
Sympathies, I believe, exist (for instance, between far-distant, long-absent, wholly estranged relatives asserting, notwithstanding their alienation, the unity of the source to which each traces his origin) whose workings baffle mortal comprehension.
To me, he signified the threatening danger was not so much death, as permanent alienation of intellect.
Though harrowing to myself to mention, the alienation of Mr.
But while he apparently studied to spare the feelings of Bois-Guilbert, he threw in, from time to time, such hints, as seemed to infer that he laboured under some temporary alienation of mind, so deeply did he appear to be enamoured of the damsel whom he brought along with him.
It would be as absurd to doubt, that a right to pass all laws NECESSARY AND PROPER to execute its declared powers, would include that of requiring the assistance of the citizens to the officers who may be intrusted with the execution of those laws, as it would be to believe, that a right to enact laws necessary and proper for the imposition and collection of taxes would involve that of varying the rules of descent and of the alienation of landed property, or of abolishing the trial by jury in cases relating to it.
On the one hand, it will be said, if concessions are made, the Parliament endanger the loss of their authority over the Colony: on the other hand, if external forces should be used, there seems to be danger of a total lasting alienation of affection.
Conscious of the state of things in that quarter, I gathered, from the condition in which I saw my employer, that his lady-love had betrayed the alienation of her affections--inclinations, rather, I would say; affection is a word at once too warm and too pure for the subject--had let him see that the cavity of her hollow heart, emptied of his image, was now occupied by that of his usher.
For there were no audible quarrels between us; our alienation, our repulsion from each other, lay within the silence of our own hearts; and if the mistress went out a great deal, and seemed to dislike the master's society, was it not natural, poor thing?
He would have been an awkward member of the party; for, though the most appreciative humanist, the most ideal religionist, even the best-versed Christologist of the three, there was alienation in the standing consciousness that his squareness would not fit the round hole that had been prepared for him.
She noticed everything about him; if there had been other signs of his utter alienation she would have sought them out, too, for she felt that it was only by heaping one truth upon another that she could keep herself sitting there, upright.