alienness


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia.

alienness

(ˈeɪlɪənnəs)
n
the state or quality or being alien, foreign, or unfamiliar
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus, the intellectuals find it easy to adopt a cosmopolitan attitude towards questions of culture and identity, while poor immigrants are constantly reminded of their otherness, foreignness, and alienness.
In Kara's foray into embracing her alienness, it's really great to see her, and it was great to feel her, being on another planet.
What counted as shameful promiscuity or prostitution in England did not in Tahiti, and the language barrier and the total alienness of these different peoples led to much misunderstanding.
The passage highlights a sense of alienness about the characters, emphasizing the idea that they are not of this time.
If periodically, at the critical junctures of existence, the peasant masses demonstrate a passion for the suppression of history's order, a desperate desire to unmake history [disfare la storia] and drive it as far back as possible into the indistinctness of chaos, this derives precisely from the fact that history's order is not currently made for these masses (even if they are trying in their own way to enter it) and that what is called History and Civilization hangs over them with anguished alienness and malevolent hostility.
Through this lens, Rosenblatt captures the utter alienness of the forest and demonstrates that, despite our dependence and proximity, we are no longer its natural inhabitants.
She learns to see herself in terms of class, her "third world" status, her barbarity and alienness.
The record, a meticulous collage of mutilated samples and computer-generated voices, careens between uncanny familiarity and total alienness.
By virtue of their very alienness, they cease to become agents in the story and instead become props, as incomprehensible and unpredictable as wild animals or winter storms.
In Stalin's Soviet Union, alienness or social nearness was not just a matter of simple inclusion or exclusion.
In having to provide basic information that most world citizens would now take for granted--such as the fact that statues of the Buddha (Shingutama) were in human form (and hence dissimilar from the Hindu gods)--we are also reminded of the sheer alienness of the religious and cultural zone into which over a hundred thousand Indians had migrated by the time Sayr-e Barhma was published.
The occasional anthropomorphization of gauna in effect plays up not only their utter alienness, but at the same time something inhuman at the heart of humanity itself (Fig.