alkalosis


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al·ka·lo·sis

 (ăl′kə-lō′sĭs)
n.
1. Abnormally high alkalinity of the blood and body tissues caused by an excess of bicarbonates, as from an increase in alkali intake, or by or a deficiency of acids other than carbonic acid, as from vomiting. Also called metabolic alkalosis.
2. Abnormally high alkalinity of the blood and body tissues caused by a deficiency of carbon dioxide due to hyperventilation. Also called respiratory alkalosis.


al′ka·lot′ic (-lŏt′ĭk) adj.

alkalosis

(ˌælkəˈləʊsɪs)
n
(Medicine) an abnormal increase in the alkalinity of the blood and extracellular fluids

al•ka•lo•sis

(ˌæl kəˈloʊ sɪs)

n.
a condition of the blood and other body fluids in which the bicarbonate concentration is above normal, tending toward alkalinity.
[1910–15]
al`ka•lot′ic (-ˈlɒt ɪk) adj.

alkalosis

a condition in which the alkali content or reserve of the body is above normal.
See also: Disease and Illness
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.alkalosis - abnormally high alkalinity (low hydrogen-ion concentration) of the blood and other body tissuesalkalosis - abnormally high alkalinity (low hydrogen-ion concentration) of the blood and other body tissues
metabolic alkalosis - alkalosis resulting from hydrogen-ion loss or excessive intake of alkaline substances
respiratory alkalosis - alkalosis resulting from increased gas exchange in the lungs (as in hyperventilation associated with extreme anxiety or aspirin intoxication or metabolic acidosis)
pathology - any deviation from a healthy or normal condition
Translations

al·ka·lo·sis

n. alcalosis, trastorno patológico en el balance acidobásico del organismo.

alkalosis

n alcalosis f
References in periodicals archive ?
Clinical Manifestations of ARDS Acute Exudative Phase Proliferative Phase Fibrotic Phase * Dyspnea * Increased work of * Profound breathing respiratory distress * Tachypnea * Dyspnea * Critically refractory hypoxemia * Tachycardia * Tachypnea * Cyanosis * Pallor * Tachycardia * Mental status change * Mild hypoxia * Refractory * White out (white hypoxemia lung) on chest x-ray * Respiratory * Respiratory * Pulmonary alkalosis alkalosis hypertension * Bilateral pulmonary * Increased bilateral * Right heart failure infiltrates on pulmonary * Dense fibrotic chest x-ray infiltrates tissue on chest x-ray * Diaphoresis * Pulmonary * Hypercarbia hypertension * Right heart failure * Death * Pulmonary fibrosis * Hypercarbia Sources: Arbour, 2017; Carlucci et al.
This chloride-depleted state will contribute to metabolic alkalosis by enhancing renal bicarbonate reabsorption that leads to potassium wasting, as sodium is reabsorbed in exchange for secreted potassium rather than with chloride (10, 11).
Few patients with CF can have hyponatremia, hypokalemia, and metabolic alkalosis that mimic Bartter syndrome, which called PBS.
Keep in mind that too much bicarbonate can create an imbalance on the opposite end of the spectrum, called metabolic alkalosis.
Respiratory alkalosis was present in the blood gases of all patients, and initial ammonia levels were determined to be between 689 and 1575 [micro]g/dL (N: 68-136 [micro]g/dL).
It is different from Bartter's syndrome, in which hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis may develop without primary renal disease.
Findings of metabolic acidosis and alkalosis (each in 2 cases) has lead to diagnosis of renal tubular acidosis and Bartter syndrome though children were admitted with primary malnutrition.
The brain-confined alkalosis is generated by activation of Na/H exchange in the blood-brain barrier (BBB).
A variety of buffer systems contribute toward the maintenance of acid-base homeostasis, safeguarding against extreme acidosis and alkalosis conditions that could cause serious cellular dysfunction or even death.
The extremely high bicarbonate and low chloride are almost certainly due to metabolic alkalosis caused by vomiting associated with SMA syndrome (1).
Neonatal Bartter syndrome (NBS) is an autosomal recessive renal tubulopathy characterized by hypokalaemic, hypochloraemic metabolic alkalosis associated with increased urinary loss of sodium, potassium, calcium and chloride.