allegory


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to allegory: allusion, Allegory of the cave
click for a larger image
allegory
early 1790s self-portrait by Angelica Kaufmann (1741-1807) entitled The Artist Hesitating Between the Arts of Music and Painting

al·le·go·ry

 (ăl′ĭ-gôr′ē)
n. pl. al·le·go·ries
1.
a. The representation of abstract ideas or principles by characters, figures, or events in narrative, dramatic, or pictorial form.
b. A story, picture, or play employing such representation. John Bunyan's Pilgrim's Progress and Herman Melville's Moby-Dick are allegories.
2. A symbolic representation: The blindfolded figure with scales is an allegory of justice.

[Middle English allegorie, from Latin allēgoria, from Greek, from allēgorein, to interpret allegorically : allos, other; see al- in Indo-European roots + agoreuein, to speak publicly (from agorā, marketplace; see ger- in Indo-European roots).]

al′le·go′rist n.

allegory

(ˈælɪɡərɪ)
n, pl -ries
1. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a poem, play, picture, etc, in which the apparent meaning of the characters and events is used to symbolize a deeper moral or spiritual meaning
2. (Art Terms) a poem, play, picture, etc, in which the apparent meaning of the characters and events is used to symbolize a deeper moral or spiritual meaning
3. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) the technique or genre that this represents
4. (Art Terms) the technique or genre that this represents
5. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) use of such symbolism to illustrate truth or a moral
6. (Art Terms) use of such symbolism to illustrate truth or a moral
7. anything used as a symbol or emblem
[C14: from Old French allegorie, from Latin allēgoria, from Greek, from allēgorein to speak figuratively, from allos other + agoreuein to make a speech in public, from agora a public gathering]
ˈallegorist n

al•le•go•ry

(ˈæl əˌgɔr i, -ˌgoʊr i)

n., pl. -ries.
1. the representation of spiritual, moral, or other abstract meanings through the actions of fictional characters that serve as symbols.
2. an allegorical or figurative narrative, poem, or the like: the allegory of Piers Plowman.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin allēgoria < Greek allēgoría, derivative of allēgoreîn to speak so as to imply something other = all- all- + -ēgorein to speak (see category)]

allegory

an art form, as a story, painting, or sculpture, in which the components have a symbolic, figurative meaning. — allegorist, allegorizer, n.allegorical, adj.
See also: Representation
an art form, as a story, painting, or sculpture, in which the components have a symbolic, figurative meaning. — allegorist, allegorizer, n. — allegorical, adj.
See also: Art
an art form, as a story, painting, or sculpture, in which the components have a symbolic, figurative meaning. — allegorist, allegorizer, n. — allegorical, adj.
See also: Literature

allegory

A form in which the action and other elements stand for something else in real life.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.allegory - a short moral story (often with animal characters)allegory - a short moral story (often with animal characters)
story - a piece of fiction that narrates a chain of related events; "he writes stories for the magazines"
Aesop's fables - a collection of fables believed to have been written by the Greek storyteller Aesop
2.allegory - a visible symbol representing an abstract ideaallegory - a visible symbol representing an abstract idea
symbolic representation, symbolisation, symbolization, symbol - something visible that by association or convention represents something else that is invisible; "the eagle is a symbol of the United States"
scarlet letter - the letter A in red; Puritans required adulterers to wear it
cupid - a symbol for love in the form of a cherubic naked boy with wings and a bow and arrow
donkey - the symbol of the Democratic Party; introduced in cartoons by Thomas Nast in 1874
dove - an emblem of peace
eagle - an emblem representing power; "the Roman eagle"
elephant - the symbol of the Republican Party; introduced in cartoons by Thomas Nast in 1874
fasces - bundle of rods containing an axe with the blade protruding; in ancient Rome it was a symbol of a magistrate's power; in modern Italy it is a symbol of fascism
national flag, ensign - an emblem flown as a symbol of nationality
hammer and sickle - the emblem on the flag of the Soviet Union
red flag - the emblem of socialist revolution
Magen David, Mogen David, Shield of David, Solomon's seal, Star of David - a six-pointed star formed from two equilateral triangles; an emblem symbolizing Judaism
badge - an emblem (a small piece of plastic or cloth or metal) that signifies your status (rank or membership or affiliation etc.); "they checked everyone's badge before letting them in"
Agnus Dei, Paschal Lamb - figure of a lamb; emblematic of Christ
maple-leaf - the emblem of Canada
medallion - an emblem indicating that a taxicab is registered
spread eagle - an emblem (an eagle with wings and legs spread) on the obverse of the Great Seal of the United States
Hakenkreuz, swastika - the official emblem of the Nazi Party and the Third Reich; a cross with the arms bent at right angles in a clockwise direction
3.allegory - an expressive style that uses fictional characters and events to describe some subject by suggestive resemblancesallegory - an expressive style that uses fictional characters and events to describe some subject by suggestive resemblances; an extended metaphor
expressive style, style - a way of expressing something (in language or art or music etc.) that is characteristic of a particular person or group of people or period; "all the reporters were expected to adopt the style of the newspaper"

allegory

noun symbol, story, tale, myth, symbolism, emblem, fable, parable, apologue The book is a kind of allegory of the country's history.
Translations
alegoriejinotaj
allegoriavertauskuva

allegory

[ˈælɪgərɪ] Nalegoría f

allegory

[ˈælɪgəri] nallégorie f
an allegory of sth → une allégorie de qch

allegory

nAllegorie f

allegory

[ˈælɪgərɪ] nallegoria
References in classic literature ?
No one knew me, for I disguised my voice, and no one dreamed of the silent, haughty Miss March (for they think I am very stiff and cool, most of them, and so I am to whippersnappers) could dance and dress, and burst out into a `nice derangement of epitaphs, like an allegory on the banks of the Nile'.
The whole landscape, which, seen by a favoring light, and in a genial temperature, had been found so lovely, appeared now like some pictured allegory of life, in which objects were arrayed in their harshest but truest colors, and without the relief of any shadowing.
So ignorant are most landsmen of some of the plainest and most palpable wonders of the world, that without some hints touching the plain facts, historical and otherwise, of the fishery, they might scout at Moby Dick as a monstrous fable, or still worse and more detestable, a hideous and intolerable allegory.
Her eyes blazed up, and she jumped for him like a wild-cat, and when she was done with him she was rags and he wasn't anything but an allegory.
365-427), whose exquisite allegory "The Peach Blossom Fountain" is quoted by Professor Giles in his `Chinese Literature'.
Let me tell you an allegory, dearest, and do you hearken to it.
In the slight sketch here attempted, the facts, recorded on the grave pages of our New England annalists, have wrought themselves, almost spontaneously, into a sort of allegory.
The scene of this romance, which opens well, is laid in the South Seas, but everything soon becomes overdrawn and fantastical, and the thread of the story loses itself in a mystical allegory.
His writings, to do them justice, are not altogether destitute of fancy and originality; they might have won him greater reputation but for an inveterate love of allegory, which is apt to invest his plots and characters with the aspect of scenery and people in the clouds, and to steal away the human warmth out of his conceptions.
Acts, attitudes, external objects, were accepted as an allegory even without the key; and they knew when a crisis had come, when they did not know what it was.
When Epstein, the agent, wrote to say that the allegory had been purchased by a Glasgow plutocrat of the name of Bates for one hundred and sixty guineas, Sellers' views on Philistines and their crass materialism and lack of taste underwent a marked modification.
But its roomy staircases, passages, and antechambers still remain; and even its painted ceilings, where Allegory, in Roman helmet and celestial linen, sprawls among balustrades and pillars, flowers, clouds, and big-legged boys, and makes the head ache--as would seem to be Allegory's object always, more or less.