allergenic


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al·ler·gen

 (ăl′ər-jən)
n.
A substance, such as pollen, that causes an allergy.

[German Allergen : Aller(gie), allergy; see allergy + -gen, -gen (from French -gène; see -gen).]

al′ler·gen′ic (-jĕn′ĭk) adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.allergenic - relating to or having the effect of an allergenallergenic - relating to or having the effect of an allergen
Translations

allergenic

[ˌæləˈdʒɛnɪk] ADJalergénico

allergenic

adj (Med) → allergen
References in periodicals archive ?
And vegetation can also produce allergenic pollen which exacerbates asthma,' Alcock added.
Abu Dhabi: In order to reduce the risk of children developing food allergies, parents should begin exposing them to common allergenic foods as early as six months on, doctors have advised.
description of the procurement: The danish environmental protection agency wishes to continue the targeted knowledge building on allergenic substances to support the authorities~ preventive work, In particular to form a scientific basis for regulation, Through an allergy center.
However, these male plants all produce large amounts of allergenic pollen.
Our research is just a starting point, but it does begin to suggest how chemical modifications in allergenic proteins occur and how they may affect allergenicity.
The county council's Food Safety and Food Standards team has reminded businesses in the county that they must now verbally explain or signpost allergenic information for the food they sell or provide.
NEW regulations come into force this weekend meaning businesses have to highlight any possible allergenic ingredients contained in food they sell.
Knowing this, some parents have excluded highly allergenic foods (cow's milk, soy, eggs, wheat, fish, and shellfish) from their babies' diets, believing that doing so can help prevent allergies.
Tannic acid, or tannin, is a phenolic antioxidant that binds to allergenic protein fragments, forming insoluble complexes that may keep the allergenic protein from being released in the stomach and gut.
It has been shown to bind to allergenic protein fragments, forming insoluble complexes that may keep the allergenic protein from being released in the stomach and gut.
The European Commission adopted, on 25 September, a report based on the results of three assessment studies carried out to investigate the need for possible new labelling requirements of textile and leather products as well as allergenic substances in finished textile products.
Eight or 9 patients (exact number unclear) were cured by avoidance of allergenic foods.