alligator


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Financial, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to alligator: Chinese alligator

al·li·ga·tor

 (ăl′ĭ-gā′tər)
n.
1. Either of two large semiaquatic reptiles, Alligator mississipiensis of the southeast United States or A. sinensis of China, having sharp teeth and powerful jaws. They differ from crocodiles in having a broader, shorter snout.
2. Leather made from the hide of one of these reptiles.
3. A tool or fastener having strong, adjustable, often toothed jaws.

[Alteration of Spanish el lagarto, the lizard : el, the (from Latin ille, that; see al- in Indo-European roots) + lagarto, lizard (from Latin lacertus).]

alligator

(ˈælɪˌɡeɪtə)
n
1. (Animals) a large crocodilian, Alligator mississipiensis, of the southern US, having powerful jaws and sharp teeth and differing from the crocodiles in having a shorter and broader snout: family Alligatoridae (alligators and caymans)
2. (Animals) a similar but smaller species, A. sinensis, occurring in China near the Yangtse River
3. (Animals) any crocodilian belonging to the family Alligatoridae
4. (Tools) any of various tools or machines having adjustable toothed jaws, used for gripping, crushing, or compacting
[C17: from Spanish el lagarto the lizard, from Latin lacerta]

al•li•ga•tor

(ˈæl ɪˌgeɪ tər)

n.
either of two crocodilians of the genus Alligator, of the southeastern U.S. and E China, characterized by a broad snout.
[1560–70; < Sp el lagarto the lizard < Vulgar Latin *ille that + *lacartus, for Latin lacertus lizard]

al·li·ga·tor

(ăl′ĭ-gā′tər)
A large, meat-eating, aquatic reptile having sharp teeth and powerful jaws. Alligators have a broader, shorter snout than crocodiles, and their teeth do not show when the jaws are closed. There are two species of alligators: one living in the southeast United States and one living in China.

alligator

- From Spanish el lagarto, "the lizard," which may have come from Latin lacerta; the alligator has a shorter, blunter snout than a crocodile.
See also related terms for shorter.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.alligator - leather made from alligator's hidealligator - leather made from alligator's hide  
leather - an animal skin made smooth and flexible by removing the hair and then tanning
2.alligator - either of two amphibious reptiles related to crocodiles but with shorter broader snoutsalligator - either of two amphibious reptiles related to crocodiles but with shorter broader snouts
crocodilian, crocodilian reptile - extant archosaurian reptile
genus Alligator - type genus of the Alligatoridae
Alligator mississipiensis, American alligator - large alligator of the southeastern United States
Alligator sinensis, Chinese alligator - small alligator of the Yangtze valley of China having unwebbed digits
Verb1.alligator - crack and acquire the appearance of alligator hide, as from weathering or improper applicationalligator - crack and acquire the appearance of alligator hide, as from weathering or improper application; of paint and varnishes
crack - break partially but keep its integrity; "The glass cracked"
Translations
القاطور: تِمْساح أمْريكِيتـِمْساحٌ أَمِرِيكيّ
aligátor
alligator
تمساح
alligaattori
aligator
aligátor
krókódíll
わに
악어
aligatorius
aligators
aligátor
aligator
alligator
จระเข้
cá sấucá sấu Mỹ

alligator

[ˈælɪgeɪtəʳ] Ncaimán m

alligator

[ˈælɪgeɪtər]
nalligator m
modif [shoes, handbag] → en peau d'alligator, en alligatorall-important [ˌɔːlɪmˈpɔːrtənt] adjcapital(e), crucial(e)all-in [ˌɔːlˈɪn] adj [charge] → tout compris inv
see also allall-inclusive [ˌɔːlɪnˈkluːsɪv] adj [price, rate] → tout compris invall-in-one [ˌɔːlɪnˈwʌn] ncombinaison fall-in wrestling n (British)catch m

alligator

nAlligator m; alligator(-skin) bagAlligatorledertasche f

alligator

[ˈælɪgeɪtəʳ] nalligatore m

alligator

(ˈӕligeitə) noun
a kind of large reptile closely related to the crocodile, found mainly in the rivers of the warmer parts of America.

alligator

تـِمْساحٌ أَمِرِيكيّ aligátor alligator Alligator αλιγάτορας caimán alligaattori alligator aligator alligatore ワニ 악어 alligator alligator aligator jacaré аллигатор alligator จระเข้ timsah cá sấu Mỹ 短嘴鳄
References in classic literature ?
But I understand there are deep pools of water in the land where we are going, and in them lives a fish that has a hide like an alligator and a jaw like a shark.
They say the alligator, the rhinoceros, though enclosed in bullet-proof mail, have each a spot where they are vulnerable; and fierce, reckless, unbelieving reprobates, have commonly this point in superstitious dread.
I will no longer be housekeeper for you if you don't send away that alligator.
In the interior was displayed a stuffed alligator, a rattlesnake's skin, a bundle of Indian arrows, an old-fashioned matchlock gun, a walking-stick of Governor Winthrop's, a wig of old Cotton Mather's, and a colored print of the Boston massacre.
It slid forward slowly, as an alligator moves, and three or four others followed it.
At night I dream of all the animals, one by one--the giraffe, the two dromedaries, the young lion, the alligator, and Alexander.
Frequently, too, the villages on its shores are half submerged, as was the case with Ngornou in 1856, and now the hippopotamus and the alligator frisk and dive where the dwellings of Bornou once stood.
There was a tree just behind which bore alligator pears, and all about were the cocoa-nuts which gave the land its revenue.
It was a single arch of gray stone, and lying flat upon the bridge was a scarlet alligator, seemingly fast asleep.
I've just composed a tune called 'The Speckled Alligator.
They resembled a whale with the head of an alligator.
Our boys would as soon interview a loose alligator in the zoo.