alms


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alms

 (ämz)
pl.n.
Money or goods given as charity to the poor.

[Middle English almes, from Old English ælmesse, from Late Latin eleēmosyna, from Greek eleēmosunē, pity, charity, from eleēmōn, pitiful, from eleos, pity.]

alms

(ɑːmz)
pl n
charitable donations of money or goods to the poor or needy
[Old English ælmysse, from Late Latin eleēmosyna, from Greek eleēmosunē pity; see eleemosynary]

alms

(ɑmz)

n. (used with a sing. or pl. v.)
money, food, or other donations given to the poor or needy.
[before 1000; Middle English almes, almesse, Old English ælmesse « Late Latin elēmosynae (pl.) charity, alms; see eleemosynary]

alms

- Goes back to Greek eleemosune, "compassion, pity," and eleos, "mercy."
See also related terms for pity.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.alms - money or goods contributed to the pooralms - money or goods contributed to the poor
donation, contribution - act of giving in common with others for a common purpose especially to a charity
plural, plural form - the form of a word that is used to denote more than one

alms

plural noun (Old-fashioned) donation, relief, gift, charity, bounty, benefaction Alms were distributed to those in need.

alms

noun
Something given to a charity or cause:
Translations
صَدَقَه، صَدَقَات
almužna
almisse
ölmusa
išmalda
žēlastības dāvana

alms

[ɑːmz] NPLlimosna fsing

alms

[ˈɑːmz] naumône f

alms

plAlmosen pl

alms

:
alms box
nAlmosenstock m
almshouse
nArmenhaus nt

alms

[ɑːmz] npl (old) → elemosina sg
to give alms → fare l'elemosina

alms

(aːmz) noun plural
money etc given to the poor.
References in classic literature ?
Is this the still militant old man, standing at the corners of the three kingdoms, on all hands coercing alms of beggars?
When I was ready to leave, I observed two wrinkled old women standing stiffly upright against the inner wall, near the door, with their brown palms open to receive alms.
Pure, bracing ventilation they must have up there at all times, indeed: one may guess the power of the north wind blowing over the edge, by the excessive slant of a few stunted firs at the end of the house; and by a range of gaunt thorns all stretching their limbs one way, as if craving alms of the sun.
Accept this alms, friend,'' continued the lady, offering a piece of gold, ``in acknowledgment of thy painful travail, and of the shrines thou hast visited.
He gave presents to his friends, and large alms to the poor.
It is true that this people has a natural disposition to goodness; they are very liberal of their alms, they much frequent their churches, and are very studious to adorn them; they practise fasting and other mortifications, and notwithstanding their separation from the Roman Church, and the corruptions which have crept into their faith, yet retain in a great measure the devout fervour of the primitive Christians.
It is true," said the good old man, "and indeed, sir, as far as the charge of sorcery goes I was not guilty; as to that of being a pimp I cannot deny it; but I never thought I was doing any harm by it, for my only object was that all the world should enjoy itself and live in peace and quiet, without quarrels or troubles; but my good intentions were unavailing to save me from going where I never expect to come back from, with this weight of years upon me and a urinary ailment that never gives me a moment's ease;" and again he fell to weeping as before, and such compassion did Sancho feel for him that he took out a real of four from his bosom and gave it to him in alms.
This old fellow walked boldly up to Robin and asked alms of him; since Robin had been wont to aid members of his order.
He left the management of his property to his niece, who gave him the income of it, and to whom he paid a slender board in order to spend the surplus in secret alms and gifts to the Church.
Passepartout jumped off the box and followed his master, who, after paying the cabman, was about to enter the station, when a poor beggar-woman, with a child in her arms, her naked feet smeared with mud, her head covered with a wretched bonnet, from which hung a tattered feather, and her shoulders shrouded in a ragged shawl, approached, and mournfully asked for alms.
D'Artagnan drew himself up with a proud air which plainly said, "I ask alms of no man.
I could scarcely walk when my mother, who was called Vasiliki, which means royal," said the young girl, tossing her head proudly, "took me by the hand, and after putting in our purse all the money we possessed, we went out, both covered with veils, to solicit alms for the prisoners, saying, `He who giveth to the poor lendeth to the Lord.