almshouse


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alms·house

 (ämz′hous′)
n.
1. A poorhouse.
2. Chiefly British A home for the poor that is maintained by private charity.

almshouse

(ˈɑːmzˌhaʊs)
n
1. (Historical Terms) history Brit a privately supported house offering accommodation to the aged or needy
2. chiefly Brit another name for poorhouse

alms•house

(ˈɑmzˌhaʊs)

n., pl. -hous•es (-ˌhaʊ zɪz)
1. Brit. a private establishment for housing the poor.
[1350–1400]

almshouse

Housing endowed by a public or private charity for use by the poor.
Translations

almshouse

[ˈɑːmzhaʊs] N (almshouses (pl)) → hospicio m, casa f de beneficencia

almshouse

alms-house [ˈɑːmzhaʊs] nhospice m

almshouse

[ˈɑːmzˌhaʊs] nospizio
References in classic literature ?
They were generally poverty-stricken; always plebeian and obscure; working with unsuccessful diligence at handicrafts; laboring on the wharves, or following the sea, as sailors before the mast; living here and there about the town, in hired tenements, and coming finally to the almshouse as the natural home of their old age.
In almshouse, hospital, and jail, in misery's every refuge, where vain man in his little brief authority had not made fast the door and barred the Spirit out, he left his blessing, and taught Scrooge his precepts.
Tabitha Porter was an old maid, upwards of sixty years of age, fifty-five of which she had sat in that same chimney-corner, such being the length of time since Peter's grandfather had taken her from the almshouse.
The New York City Almshouse, at Bellevue on the East River, housed over 1,500 inmates at a time(with annual deaths approaching 500), and served as a last refuge for the destitute of all ages}
He was a man that had devoted many years of his life to money digging, and it was thought would have ultimately succeeded had he not died recently of a brain fever in the almshouse.
This couple from the palace and the almshouse are but the types of thousands more who represent the dark tragedy of life and seldom quarrel for the upper parts.
She broke in: "You're neglecting the farm enough already," and this being true, he found no answer, and left her time to add ironically: "Better send me over to the almshouse and done with it.
But the more I thought of it, the more I felt the weight of it upon my mind; and I never got quite rid of the impression until I put a couple of old women into an almshouse and kept them there at my own expense.
She has been celebrated in all the medical newspapers--and she has been admitted to come excellent almshouse, to live in comfortable idleness to a green old age.
She took to her bed at once, received her friends in tears and a point-lace cap, and cheered her family by plaintively inquiring when she was to be taken to the almshouse.
A MILLIONAIRE who had gone to an almshouse to visit his father met a Neighbour there, who was greatly surprised.
Old Moreau's case suggested the idea to me of founding an almshouse for the country people of the district; a refuge for those who, after working hard all their lives, have reached an honorable old age of poverty.