alpha-linolenic acid


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alpha-linolenic acid

n
(Elements & Compounds) another name for linolenic acid
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Noun1.alpha-linolenic acid - a polyunsaturated fatty acid with 18 carbon atoms; the only omega-3 fatty acid found in vegetable products; it is most abundant in canola oil; a fatty acid essential for nutrition
omega-3, omega-3 fatty acid - a polyunsaturated fatty acid whose carbon chain has its first double valence bond three carbons from the beginning
References in periodicals archive ?
By comparison with equids, ruminants - and bovids in particular - are, it seems, always low in alpha-linolenic acid and its conversion products because of their destruction in the rumen.
Editor's Note: "We also found that higher dietary intake of alpha-linolenic acid, a type of omega-3 fatty acid found in vegetable oils and nuts, is associated with lower ALS risk," Kathryn Fitzgerald added.
Careful evaluation of recent evidence, however, suggests that allowing a health claim for vegetable oils rich in omega-6 linoleic acid but relatively poor in omega-3 alpha-linolenic acid may not be warranted," Drs.
Dietary alpha-linolenic acid is associated with reduced risk of fatal coronary heart disease, but increased prostate cancer risk: a meta-analysis.
According to the researchers, walnuts contain alpha-linolenic acid, gamma-tocopherol and phytosterols, which may explain the positive effects of the walnut oil treatment.
Alpha-linolenic acid can be converted to EPA and DHA in our bodies to a limited degree.
Alpha-linolenic acid leads to a reduction in bone turnover, and a shift in the balance of bone degradation/formation toward formation.
Flaxseed oil contains alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), but its conversion by the body to EPA and DHA is slow and inefficient, and thus flaxseed oil does not appear to be as effective as fish oil in reducing inflammation.
Another source of omega-3 EFAs that is growing in popularity is flaxseed: it was flaxseed and other foods rich in alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) that earned a reputation for healthy living in the past--and this recognition is being reawakened.
Terrestrial plants contain the omega-6 fatty acid linoleic acid and the omega-3 fatty acid alpha-linolenic acid but not the long-chain metabolites arachidonic acid, or EPA and DHA.
Previous studies have shown that omega 3 fatty acids, such as the alpha-linolenic acid found in walnuts and flax seeds, can reduce levels of low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) (the undesirable kind).
In the Jan/Feb issue of Running & FitNews[R] we discussed how, of all nuts, walnuts have the greatest concentration of omega-3 fatty acids and contain more alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) in particular than do other nuts.