altruism


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

al·tru·ism

 (ăl′tro͞o-ĭz′əm)
n.
1. Unselfish concern for the welfare of others; selflessness.
2. Zoology Instinctive behavior that is detrimental to the individual but favors the survival or spread of that individual's genes, as by benefiting its relatives.

[French altruisme, probably from Italian altrui, someone else, from Latin alter, other; see al- in Indo-European roots.]

al′tru·ist n.
al′tru·is′tic adj.
al′tru·is′ti·cal·ly adv.

altruism

(ˈæltruːˌɪzəm)
n
1. the principle or practice of unselfish concern for the welfare of others
2. (Philosophy) the philosophical doctrine that right action is that which produces the greatest benefit to others
[C19: from French altruisme, from Italian altrui others, from Latin alterī, plural of alter other]
ˈaltruist n
ˌaltruˈistic adj
ˌaltruˈistically adv

al•tru•ism

(ˈæl truˌɪz əm)

n.
1. the principle or practice of unselfish concern for the welfare of others (opposed to egoism).
2. behavior by an animal that may be to its disadvantage but that benefits others of its kind.
[1850–55; < French altruisme=autru(i) others + -isme -ism]
al′tru•ist, n.
al`tru•is′tic, adj.
al`tru•is′ti•cal•ly, adv.

altruism

a concern or regard for the needs of others, entirely without ulterior motive. — altruist, n.altruistic, adj.
See also: Attitudes
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.altruism - the quality of unselfish concern for the welfare of othersaltruism - the quality of unselfish concern for the welfare of others
unselfishness - the quality of not putting yourself first but being willing to give your time or money or effort etc. for others; "rural people show more devotion and unselfishness than do their urban cousins"
egocentrism, self-centeredness, self-concern, self-interest, egoism - concern for your own interests and welfare

altruism

altruism

noun
Translations
altruismus
altruizam
利他主義
altruism

altruism

[ˈæltrʊɪzəm] Naltruismo m

altruism

[ˈæltruɪzəm] naltruisme m

altruism

nAltruismus m

altruism

[ˈæltrʊɪzm] naltruismo
References in classic literature ?
Spencer I remembered enough to know that altruism was imperative to his ideal of highest conduct.
With immortality before me, altruism would be a paying business proposition.
Lop-Ear was plainly in a funk, and yet his conduct in remaining by me, in spite of his fear, I take as a foreshadowing of the altruism and comradeship that have helped make man the mightiest of the animals.
He found in altruism more pleasure than his riches, his station and all the grosser sweets of life had given him.
In the last two verses he reveals the nature of his altruism.
The majority of people spoil their lives by an unhealthy and exaggerated altruism - are forced, indeed, so to spoil them.
Likewise, regarding social measures in developing altruism and martyrdom culture, one could refer to developing of signs and symbol of altruism and martyrdom, developing of symbol through building of commemorative place for martyrs, cultural and promotional space- building (graffiti) throughout the cities, naming streets and plazas and schools and universities under titles of martyrs, holding the exhibitions and museums of altruism and martyrdom, and holding sport cups and contests with titles relating to altruism and martyrdom.
In Survival of the Nicest, newly released in paperback, Klein offers a slew of evidence to the contrary, showing that inner altruism crops up consistently even at the expense of personal safety or profit.
1983) the pioneers of OCB concept, conceptualised it with two dimensions that is, altruism (behaviour targeted specifically at helping individuals) and generalised compliance (behaviour reflecting compliance with general rules, norms and expectations).
Altruism represents an individual's willingness to benefit the well being of others on a voluntary basis without the anticipation of any form of return (Chai & Kim, 2010; Deci, 1975; Kankanhalli, Tan, & Wei, 2005).
25) Although altruism might motivate such a donation in part, other factors likely also motivate the donation.
The matter of altruism has been object of scrutiny in biology since 1872 when Charles Darwin used his theory of evolution, based on natural and sexual selection, to explain what he called "moral sense" in his own words "'Any animal whatever, endowed with well-marked social instincts, the parental and filial affections being here included, would inevitably acquire a moral sense or conscience, as soon as its intellectual power had become as well developed, or nearby as well developed, as in man' (Darwin, 2002, pg.