restoration

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res·to·ra·tion

 (rĕs′tə-rā′shən)
n.
1.
a. An act of restoring: damage too great for restoration.
b. An instance of restoring or of being restored: Restoration of the sculpture was expensive.
c. The state of being restored.
2. Something, such as a renovated building, that has been restored.
3. Restoration
a. The return of a constitutional monarchy to Great Britain in 1660 under Charles II.
b. The period between the crowning of Charles II and the Revolution of 1688.

restoration

(ˌrɛstəˈreɪʃən)
n
1. the act of restoring or state of being restored, as to a former or original condition, place, etc
2. the replacement or giving back of something lost, stolen, etc
3. something restored, replaced, or reconstructed
4. a model or representation of an extinct animal, landscape of a former geological age, etc

Restoration

(ˌrɛstəˈreɪʃən)
n
1. (Historical Terms) history
a. the re-establishment of the monarchy in 1660 or the reign of Charles II (1660–85)
b. (as modifier): Restoration drama.
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) history
a. the re-establishment of the monarchy in 1660 or the reign of Charles II (1660–85)
b. (as modifier): Restoration drama.

res•to•ra•tion

(ˌrɛs təˈreɪ ʃən)

n.
1. the act of restoring.
2. the state of being restored.
3. a return of something to an original or unimpaired condition.
4. restitution of something taken away or lost.
5. something restored, as by renovating.
6. a reconstruction or reproduction, as of an extinct form, showing it in the original state.
7.
a. the work or process of replacing or restoring teeth or parts of teeth.
b. something that restores or replaces teeth, as a denture or filling.
8. the Restoration,
a. the reestablishment of the monarchy in England with the return of Charles II in 1660.
b. the period of the reign of Charles II (1660–85), sometimes including the reign of James II (1685–88).
[1350–1400; < Late Latin restaurātiō < Latin restaurāre to restore]

Restoration

1660 The return of the Stuart dynasty after the Commonwealth. Also refers to the social and artistic fashions introduced during the period 1660–1714.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.restoration - the reign of Charles II in EnglandRestoration - the reign of Charles II in England; 1660-1685
2.restoration - the act of restoring something or someone to a satisfactory state
re-establishment - restoration to a previous state; "regular exercise resulted in the re-establishment of his endurance"
fixing, repair, mend, mending, reparation, fix, fixture - the act of putting something in working order again
gentrification - the restoration of run-down urban areas by the middle class (resulting in the displacement of low-income residents)
reclamation, renewal, rehabilitation - the conversion of wasteland into land suitable for use of habitation or cultivation
rehabilitation - the restoration of someone to a useful place in society
reinstatement - the act of restoring someone to a previous position; "we insisted on the reinstatement of the colonel"
rejuvenation - the act of restoring to a more youthful condition
3.restoration - getting something back again; "upon the restitution of the book to its rightful owner the child was given a tongue lashing"
acquisition - the act of contracting or assuming or acquiring possession of something; "the acquisition of wealth"; "the acquisition of one company by another"
clawback - finding a way to take money back from people that they were given in another way; "the Treasury will find some clawback for the extra benefits members received"
4.restoration - the state of being restored to its former good condition; "the inn was a renovation of a Colonial house"
melioration, improvement - a condition superior to an earlier condition; "the new school represents a great improvement"
5.restoration - some artifact that has been restored or reconstructed; "the restoration looked exactly like the original"
artefact, artifact - a man-made object taken as a whole
6.restoration - a model that represents the landscape of a former geological age or that represents and extinct animal etc.
simulation, model - representation of something (sometimes on a smaller scale)
7.Restoration - the re-establishment of the British monarchy in 1660
England - a division of the United Kingdom

restoration

noun
1. reinstatement, return, revival, restitution, re-establishment, reinstallation, replacement the restoration of diplomatic relations
reinstatement overthrow, abolition

restoration

noun
The act of making new or as if new again:
Translations
تَرْميم، تَصْليح
rekonstrukce
restaurering
palauttaminenrestaurointi
restaurationrenouvèlement
restaurálás
viîgerî
obnova
restorasyon yenileme

restoration

[ˌrestəˈreɪʃən] N
1. [of money, possession] → devolución f, restitución f (frm)
2. [of relations, links, order] → restablecimiento m; [of confidence] → devolución f; [of monarchy, democracy] → restauración f
3. [of building, painting, antique] → restauración f
4. (Brit) (Hist) the Restorationla Restauración (época que comienza con la restauración de Carlos II en el trono británico)

Restoration

[ˌrɛstəˈreɪʃən] n (in Britain) the Restoration → la Restauration anglaise

restoration

[ˌrɛstəˈreɪʃən]
n
[monument, building] → restauration f; [painting, parchment] → restauration f
(re-establishment) [law, order, democracy, monarchy, links, relations] → restauration
(= giving back) [property] → restitution f
modif [project, work] → de restauration

restoration

n
(= return)Rückgabe f (→ to an +acc); (of property)Rückerstattung f, → Rückgabe f (→ to an +acc); (of confidence, order, calm, peace)Wiederherstellung f; (to office) → Wiedereinsetzung f (→ to in +acc)
the Restoration (Hist) → die Restauration
(of monument, work of art)Restaurierung f
(Comput) (of window, file, default etc)Wiederherstellung f

restoration

[ˌrɛstəˈreɪʃn] n
a. (repair, of building, monument) → restauro
b. (return, of land, property) → restituzione f, riconsegna; (reintroduction, of law and order) → ripristino; (of confidence) → ristabilimento (History) the Restorationla Restaurazione

restore

(rəˈstoː) verb
1. to repair (a building, a painting, a piece of furniture etc) so that it looks as it used to or ought to.
2. to bring back to a normal or healthy state. The patient was soon restored to health.
3. to bring or give back. to restore law and order; The police restored the stolen cars to their owners.
4. to bring or put (a person) back to a position, rank etc he once had. He was asked to resign but was later restored to his former job as manager.
ˌrestoˈration (restə-) noun
The building was closed for restoration(s).
reˈstorer noun
a person or thing that restores. a furniture-restorer.

res·to·ra·tion

n. restauración, restitución, restablecimiento, acción de restituir algo a su estado original.

restoration

n (dent, surg) restauración f
References in periodicals archive ?
Devaluing Professional hygienist dental hygienist cleaning prophylaxis checkup examination filling restoration tooth-colored filling composite restoration silver filling amalgam restoration the girl up front office manager, dental receptionist, etc.
15) MRI radiation, as well as RF radiation, will significantly increase release of mercury from dental amalgam restoration.
Literature revealed that in the year 1861, John Tomes reported shrinkage of amalgam restoration.
Clinically, tooth #30 had a large coronal amalgam restoration.
Interview data about occupational exposure to mercury, fish consumption, amalgam restoration, amalgam fillings, smoking habits, and the use of chewing gum are shown in Table 3.
Traditional Restorative Treatment involves the complete removal of soft, demineralised tooth tissue using predominately rotary instruments, followed by restoration of the tooth with either a plastic- or amalgam restoration, requiring use of LA.
Since the obturated canals were to be stored for 10 months, the coronal 2 to 3 mm of gutta-percha was removed with the System B, sealed with a 2 to 3 mm amalgam restoration (Tytin amalgam, Kerr Corporation, Orange, CA), and stored in 100% relative humidity at 37[degrees]C for 10 months.
This is because dental insurance companies are more likely to reimburse a patient for an amalgam restoration on a molar, but decline to reimburse for composite restorations because the amalgam restoration is cheaper and fits the standard of care.
Key words: cavity wall thickness, fracture strength, p ulpotomized primary molar teeth, amalgam restoration
The 5-year results of a clinical trial comparing a glass polyalkenoate (ionomer) cement restoration with an amalgam restoration.
Effective July 25, 2014, dental assistants and dental hygienists meeting prescribed requirements are permitted to perform placement, carving and finishing of amalgam restorations under the direct supervision of a dentist.