amanuensis


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a·man·u·en·sis

 (ə-măn′yo͞o-ĕn′sĭs)
n. pl. a·man·u·en·ses (-sēz)
One who is employed to take dictation or to copy manuscript.

[Latin āmanuēnsis, from the phrase (servus) ā manū, (slave) at handwriting : ā, ab, by; see ab-1 + manū, ablative of manus, hand; see man- in Indo-European roots.]

amanuensis

(əˌmænjʊˈɛnsɪs)
n, pl -ses (-siːz)
a person employed to take dictation or to copy manuscripts
[C17: from Latin āmanuensis, from the phrase servus ā manū slave at hand (that is, handwriting)]

a•man•u•en•sis

(əˌmæn yuˈɛn sɪs)

n., pl. -ses (-sēz).
a person employed to write what another dictates or to copy what has been written by another; secretary.
[1610–20; < Latin (servus) āmanuēnsis=ā- a-4 + manu-, s. of manus hand + -ēnsis -ensis]

amanuensis

- Literally "slave at hand"—for a literary assistant, especially one who takes dictation or copies manuscripts.
See also related terms for slave.

amanuensis

Formal. 1. asecretary.
2. a scribe or copyist.
See also: Occupations
Formal. 1. a secretary.
2. a scribe or copyist.
See also: Aid
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.amanuensis - someone skilled in the transcription of speech (especially dictation)amanuensis - someone skilled in the transcription of speech (especially dictation)
secretarial assistant, secretary - an assistant who handles correspondence and clerical work for a boss or an organization
Translations

amanuensis

[əˌmænjʊˈensɪs] N (amanuenses (pl)) [əˌmænjuˈensiːz]amanuense mf

amanuensis

n pl <amanuenses> → Sekretär(in) m(f); (Hist) → Amanuensis m

amanuensis

[əˌmænjʊˈɛnsɪs] n (amanuenses (pl)) [əˌmænjʊˈɛnsiːz] (frm) → amanuense m
References in classic literature ?
He said that men cured in this way, and enabled to discard the grape system, never afterward got over the habit of talking as if they were dictating to a slow amanuensis, because they always made a pause between each two words while they sucked the substance out of an imaginary grape.
Jack Maldon having lately proffered his occasional services as an amanuensis, and not being accustomed to that occupation; but we should soon put right what was amiss, and go on swimmingly.
The task, notwithstanding the assistance of my amanuensis, has been a somewhat laborious one, but your society has happily prevented me from that too continuous prosecution of thought beyond the hours of study which has been the snare of my solitary life.
Nicholas briefly replied, that he wanted to know whether there was any such post to be had, as secretary or amanuensis to a gentleman.
The writer, indeed, seems to think himself obliged to keep even pace with time, whose amanuensis he is; and, like his master, travels as slowly through centuries of monkish dulness, when the world seems to have been asleep, as through that bright and busy age so nobly distinguished by the excellent Latin poet--
And it was easy to see how necessary such an amanuensis was to him, by the tenor and spelling of the numerous letters which he sent to her, entreating her and commanding her to return.
This ambitious novel is her fictionalizing of the life of the confidante, amanuensis, muse and possibly even clandestine wife of the 18th-century clergyman and satirist Jonathan Swift (Esther is the "Stella" of his poems and epistolary Journal to Stella).
Colbert suggested when he accused the press corps of being nothing but an amanuensis for the the latter's view of reality.
Anny was now fifteen, painfully aware of the loss of her unconventional companionship with her father, whose amanuensis she had become the previous year, and resentful of the pious, circumscribed life her grandmother wished to impose.
Given the crowd of larger-than-life characters--including the Curies, Charcot, and his famous amanuensis Sigmund Freud--and the glimpses of extraordinary material drawn from the history of the physical and medical sciences, one wishes for many hundreds of pages more.
After arriving at the University of Wittenberg in 1522, he became Luther's amanuensis, editor, companion on journeys, and supervisor of the students who lived in Luther's household; reformer at Nuremberg from 1535.
Considerably more congenial was his next position as amanuensis to that old monster, the Anglo-American litterateur, Logan Pearsall Smith.