amaranth


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am·a·ranth

 (ăm′ə-rănth′)
n.
1.
a. Any of various annual plants of the genus Amaranthus having dense green or reddish clusters of tiny flowers and including weeds, ornamentals, and species cultivated for their edible leaves and seeds. Also called pigweed.
b. The small edible seeds of several of these species.
2. An imaginary flower that never fades.
3. A deep reddish purple to dark or grayish, purplish red.
4. A dark red to purple azo dye.

[New Latin Amaranthus, genus name, alteration of Latin amarantus, from Greek amarantos, unfading : a-, not; see a-1 + marainein, to wither; see mer- in Indo-European roots.]

amaranth

(ˈæməˌrænθ)
n
1. poetic an imaginary flower that never fades
2. (Plants) any of numerous tropical and temperate plants of the genus Amaranthus, having tassel-like heads of small green, red, or purple flowers: family Amaranthaceae. See also love-lies-bleeding, tumbleweed, pigweed1
3. (Cookery) a synthetic red food colouring (E123), used in packet soups, cake mixes, etc
[C17: from Latin amarantus, from Greek amarantos unfading, from a-1 + marainein to fade]

am•a•ranth

(ˈæm əˌrænθ)

n.
1. any plant of the genus Amaranthus, some species of which are cultivated as food and some for their showy flower clusters or foliage.
2. an imaginary flower that never dies.
3. a purplish red, water-soluble powder, C20H11N2O10Na3, used as a dye.
[1545–55; < Latin amarantus, alter. of Greek amáranton unfading flower, n. use of neuter singular of amárantos=a- a-6 + -marantos, v. adj. of maraínein to fade]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.amaranth - seed of amaranth plants used as a native cereal in Central and South Americaamaranth - seed of amaranth plants used as a native cereal in Central and South America
caryopsis, grain - dry seed-like fruit produced by the cereal grasses: e.g. wheat, barley, Indian corn
2.amaranth - any of various plants of the genus Amaranthus having dense plumes of green or red flowersamaranth - any of various plants of the genus Amaranthus having dense plumes of green or red flowers; often cultivated for food
Amaranthus, genus Amaranthus - large widely distributed genus of chiefly coarse annual herbs
Amaranthus albus, Amaranthus graecizans, tumbleweed - bushy plant of western United States
Amaranthus caudatus, love-lies-bleeding, velvet flower, tassel flower - young leaves widely used as leaf vegetables; seeds used as cereal
Amaranthus cruentus, Amaranthus hybridus erythrostachys, Amaranthus hybridus hypochondriacus, gentleman's-cane, purple amaranth, red amaranth, prince's-feather, prince's-plume - tall showy tropical American annual having hairy stems and long spikes of usually red flowers above leaves deeply flushed with purple; seeds often used as cereal
Amaranthus hypochondriacus, pigweed - leaves sometimes used as potherbs; seeds used as cereal; southern United States to Central America; India and China
herb, herbaceous plant - a plant lacking a permanent woody stem; many are flowering garden plants or potherbs; some having medicinal properties; some are pests
References in classic literature ?
He also admired another that came in composed of fair young maidens, none of whom seemed to be under fourteen or over eighteen years of age, all clad in green stuff, with their locks partly braided, partly flowing loose, but all of such bright gold as to vie with the sunbeams, and over them they wore garlands of jessamine, roses, amaranth, and honeysuckle.
He could see the evening gatherings, held on the circle of the threshing- floors, because that was the only level ground; could see the wonderful unnamed green of the young rice, the indigo blues of the Indian corn, the dock-like patches of buckwheat, and, in its season, the red bloom of the amaranth, whose tiny seeds, being neither grain nor pulse, make a food that can be lawfully eaten by Hindus in time of fasts.
There is no amaranth, no pomegranate here, But can your heart forget the Christmas rose, The crocuses and snowdrops once so dear?
AN AMARANTH planted in a garden near a Rose-Tree, thus addressed it: "What a lovely flower is the Rose, a favorite alike with Gods and with men.
He says that soybean farmers are having problems with a Roundup-resistant weed called Palmer amaranth.
Studies conducted in Kenya [5, 6] show that amaranth grain has a good level of iron and other nutrients and may, therefore, be a choice to use for complementary food formulation at the household level to address widespread micronutrient deficiencies.
13, 2015 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The American Diabetes Association Research Foundation received a $505,623 donation from the Amaranth Diabetes Foundation (ADF).
The charity they support is the Amaranth Diabetes Foundation.
Indigenous to Latin America, amaranth and chia are both highly versatile crops - they grow easily and prolifically in the highlands of Guatemala and are well known as drought crops that thrive in hot and dry weather.
Ancient grains--aptly named for their long history of traditional use--constitute a broad category that includes amaranth, farro, freekeh, spelt, barley, millet, teff and others.
Sorghum, amaranth, teff, buckwheat, millet and quinoa, for example, are completely safe for those who have adopted a gluten-free diet.
Cooking with Ancient Grains: 75 Delicious Recipes for Quinoa, Amaranth, Chia, and Kaniwa provides a fine survey pairing surprisingly simple recipes with grain cookery: all that's needed by the cook is access to grains such as quinoa, chia and others, and the rest falls into place.