amber


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to amber: Amber Alert
click for a larger image
amber
polished amber pendant

am·ber

 (ăm′bər)
n.
1. A hard, translucent, usually brownish-yellow fossil resin, used for making jewelry and other ornamental objects.
2. A brownish yellow.
adj.
1. Having the color of amber; brownish-yellow.
2. Made of or resembling amber: an amber necklace.

[Middle English ambre, from Old French, from Medieval Latin ambra, ambar, from Arabic 'anbar, ambergris, amber.]

amber

(ˈæmbə)
n
1. (Elements & Compounds)
a. a yellow or yellowish-brown hard translucent fossil resin derived from extinct coniferous trees that occurs in Tertiary deposits and often contains trapped insects. It is used for jewellery, ornaments, etc
b. (as modifier): an amber necklace. succinic
2. fly in amber a strange relic or reminder of the past
3. (Colours)
a. a medium to dark brownish-yellow colour, often somewhat orange, similar to that of the resin
b. (as adjective): an amber dress.
4. an amber traffic light used as a warning between red and green
[C14: from Medieval Latin ambar, from Arabic `anbar ambergris]

am•ber

(ˈæm bər)

n.
1. a yellow, red, or brown translucent fossil resin of coniferous trees that becomes charged with static electricity when rubbed: used for jewelry.
2. the yellowish brown color of amber.
adj.
3. yellowish brown.
4. made of amber.
[1350–1400; Middle English ambre < Old French < Medieval Latin ambra < Arabic ‘anbar ambergris]
click for a larger image
fossilized ant

am·ber

(ăm′bər)
A hard, translucent, brownish-yellow substance that is the fossilized resin of ancient trees. It often contains fossil insects.
Did You Know? The plot of the movie Jurassic Park turns on the extraordinary ability of amber to preserve ancient life as miniature fossils. In the movie, scientists extract dinosaur DNA from blood in the stomach of a mosquito that was trapped in amber during the Mesozoic Era. The scientists then use the DNA to create clones of the dinosaurs that end up terrorizing the park and the movie audience. What is amber, and how does it preserve such delicate tissues for millions of years? Certain trees, especially conifers, produce a sticky substance called resin to protect themselves against insects. Normally, it decays in oxygen through the action of bacteria. However, if the resin happens to fall into wet mud or sand containing little oxygen, it can harden and eventually fossilize, becoming the yellowish, translucent substance known as amber. If any insects or other organisms are trapped in the resin before it hardens, they can be preserved, often in amazing detail. While amber may sometimes preserve fragments of the DNA of the enclosed organisms, fossil mosquitoes would not contain enough dinosaur DNA to actually create clones, and the sight of dinosaurs again roaming the Earth, even in an island park, remains part of science fiction rather than real science.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.amber - a deep yellow coloramber - a deep yellow color; "an amber light illuminated the room"; "he admired the gold of her hair"
yellow, yellowness - yellow color or pigment; the chromatic color resembling the hue of sunflowers or ripe lemons
2.amber - a hard yellowish to brownish translucent fossil resinamber - a hard yellowish to brownish translucent fossil resin; used for jewelry
natural resin - a plant exudate
Adj.1.amber - of a medium to dark brownish yellow color
chromatic - being or having or characterized by hue

amber

noun
Related words
adjective succinic
Translations
كَهْرَمانكَهْرَمَان
jantarjantarový
rav
merevaik
meripihkakeltainen
jantar
borostyánborostyánkõ
raf
琥珀色
호박(광물)
gintaras
dzintara-dzintars
jantárjantárový
jantar
jantar
bärnstengul
อำพัน
hổ phách

amber

[ˈæmbəʳ]
A. Námbar m
at or on amber (Brit) (Aut) → en ámbar
B. ADJ
1. [jewellery] → de ámbar; [colour] → ambarino
2. (Brit) (Aut) amber lightluz f ámbar

amber

[ˈæmbər]
n
(= colour) → ambre m
[traffic lights] → orange m, feu m orange
on amber → à l'orange
(= mineral) → ambre m
adj (in colour) [fabric, glass] → ambré(e); [eyes] → ambré(e)
modif (= made of amber) [bead, necklace] → d'ambre

amber

nBernstein m; (colour) → Bernsteingelb nt; (Brit: in traffic lights) → Gelb nt
adjaus Bernstein; (= amber-coloured)bernsteinfarben; (Brit) traffic lightgelb; the amber nectar (Brit, Austral: inf) → das kühle Nass (inf), → der Gerstensaft (hum)

amber

[ˈæmbəʳ]
1. nambra
2. adj (colour) → ambra inv, ambrato/a (Brit) (traffic light) → giallo/a

amber

(ˈӕmbə) noun, adjective
(of) a hard yellow or brownish substance, formed from resin, used in making jewellery etc. made of amber; an amber brooch.

amber

كَهْرَمان jantar rav Bernstein κεχριμπάρι ámbar meripihka ambre jantar ambra 琥珀色 호박(광물) amber ravgul bursztyn âmbar янтарь bärnsten อำพัน kehribar hổ phách 琥珀

am·ber

n. ámbar;
a. ambarino-a.
References in classic literature ?
It was a day of amber sunlight, but there was a shiver of coming winter in the air.
He seemed to have abandoned himself to a reverie, and to be seeing pleasing visions in the amber bead.
A few amber clouds floated in the sky, without a breath of air to move them.
where, when seamen fall overboard, they are sometimes found, months afterwards, perpendicularly frozen into the hearts of fields of ice, as a fly is found glued in amber.
No,--I exaggerate; I never thought there was any consecrating virtue about her: it was rather a sort of pastille perfume she had left; a scent of musk and amber, than an odour of sanctity.
Before I arrived in sight of it, all that remained of day was a beamless amber light along the west: but I could see every pebble on the path, and every blade of grass, by that splendid moon.
Glad, of course," echoed the giantess of the amber satin, more meekly than ever.
The man had no covering upon his head, which was only defended by his own thick hair, matted and twisted together, and scorched by the influence of the sun into a rusty dark-red colour, forming a contrast with the overgrown beard upon his cheeks, which was rather of a yellow or amber hue.
The Renaissance knew of strange manners of poisoning-- poisoning by a helmet and a lighted torch, by an embroidered glove and a jewelled fan, by a gilded pomander and by an amber chain.
At one end of the court was a platform, and on the platform stood an amber throne supported by four ebony columns, garnished with pearls and diamonds.
There was a pretty legend among the Phoenicians that the pieces of amber were the petrified tears of maidens who had thrown themselves into the sea because of unrequited love, and each bead of amber was highly prized.
Until then the nose of the chevalier was ever delicate and nice; never had a damp black blotch, nor an amber drop fall from it; but now that nose, smeared with tobacco around the nostrils, degraded by the driblets which took advantage of the natural gutter placed between itself and the upper lip,--that nose, which no longer cared to seem agreeable, revealed the infinite pains which the chevalier had formerly taken with his person, and made observers comprehend, by the extent of its degradation, the greatness and persistence of the man's designs upon Mademoiselle Cormon.