ambiguousness


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am·big·u·ous

 (ăm-bĭg′yo͞o-əs)
adj.
1. Open to more than one interpretation: an ambiguous reply.
2. Doubtful or uncertain: "The theatrical status of her frequently derided but constantly revived plays remained ambiguous" (Frank Rich).

[From Latin ambiguus, uncertain, from ambigere, to go about : amb-, ambi-, around; see ambi- + agere, to drive; see ag- in Indo-European roots.]

am·big′u·ous·ly adv.
am·big′u·ous·ness n.
Synonyms: ambiguous, equivocal, vague
These adjectives mean lacking clarity, especially by being open to a variety of interpretations. Ambiguous indicates the presence of two or more possible meanings: "It was impossible to tell from his ambiguous expression whether he knew what was happening" (Paul Theroux).
Something equivocal is unclear or misleading: "The polling had a complex and equivocal message for potential female candidates" (David S. Broder).
What is vague is expressed in indefinite form or reflects imprecision of thought: "Vague ... forms of speech ... have so long passed for mysteries of science" (John Locke).
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:

ambiguousness

noun
Translations

ambiguousness

[æmˈbɪgjʊəsnɪs] Nambigüedad f

ambiguousness

nZwei- or Doppeldeutigkeit f; (= with many possible meanings)Mehr- or Vieldeutigkeit f
References in periodicals archive ?
It is this complexity and the ambiguousness of what happened - constantly referring to history - that I wanted to reflect upon in my book.
But what is revealed, then, is no longer abstract and pure: it is, rather, imbued with all the ambiguousness of the present in which decisions are made on conflicting impulses and in constraining circumstances.
CARDIFF: St David's Hall (029 2087 8444), Ben Norris: Mr Ambiguousness.
Interpretation imposes itself as a necessity for the legal system due also to the characteristics of the legal language among which, as previously shown, a type of dynamism generated by the influence of external terminology (Stoichitoiu-Ichim, 2011: 87), as well as by an accentuated tendency of ambiguousness brought about by, on the one hand, the polysemy of existing legal concepts, but also by their determination by the Legislator in a manner which is often "insufficient, equivocal, ambiguous, vague, with a variable content", on the other hand (Deleanu, 2013: 24).
Stated at this level of abstraction, of course, the rule "provides little more than atmospherics, since it leaves open the crucial question--almost invariably present--of how much ambiguousness constitutes .