ambitionless


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ambitionless

(æmˈbɪʃənlɪs)
adj
without ambition, unambitious
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.ambitionless - having little desire for success or achievementambitionless - having little desire for success or achievement
nonenterprising, unenterprising - lacking in enterprise; not bold or venturesome
References in periodicals archive ?
We are now back to the ambitionless, struggling side, just ticking over, without ever making an effort to better themselves.
Even ambitionless Leo's shouldn't pass up an opportunity to swap jobs.
Even ambitionless Leos shouldn't pass up an opportunity to swap jobs.
While Natalie manages to gradually rise above the estate tower blocks through her academic endeavors, Leah, in a paradoxical role reversal, "occupies the stereotypical position of ambitionless under-achievement often assigned by mainstream British culture to immigrant and non-white Londoners" (Wells 2013, ioo).
It is ambitionless and plays it far too safe, relying predominantly on lowbrow humour and infantile innuendos.
They are aided by the ambitionless actions of the Labour government in Cardiff Bay.
But what one must do is not criticize the reality but to take remedial action if our youth is ambitionless,"
An example of demands and duties women were expected to fulfill provides an insight into how this feature operated: a really submissive woman had to spend her life servicing to others--her husband, her children, her parents, and relatives--with ambitionless cheer, never-ending strength, and unconditioned love.
George and Martha, the ambitionless university professor and his acid-tongued wife, put each other, younger couple Nick and Honey and the audience through a booze-soaked, dark night of the soul before arriving at the tiniest speck of light at the other end.
1) Second, Creon is transformed from the relatively ambitionless playboy prince of Sophocles' original to the physically and morally twisted precipitator of the crisis, analogous to "the figure of Shaftesbury seen through royalist eyes and representations" (Novak, "Commentary to Oedipus" 462).
The mountain refers to the domain of imagination and mysticism, in other words the contrary/opposite of the valley of common reality in the domain of the ignorant and ambitionless farmer who made the eagle live with ordinary chickens.