ambivalence


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

am·biv·a·lence

 (ăm-bĭv′ə-ləns)
n.
1. The coexistence of opposing attitudes or feelings, such as love and hate, toward a person, object, or idea.
2. Uncertainty or indecisiveness as to which course to follow.

[German Ambivalenz : Latin ambi-, ambi- + Latin valentia, vigor (from valēns, valent-, present participle of valēre, to be strong; see wal- in Indo-European roots).]

ambivalence

(æmˈbɪvələns) or

ambivalency

n
the simultaneous existence of two opposed and conflicting attitudes, emotions, etc
amˈbivalent adj

am•biv•a•lence

(æmˈbɪv ə ləns)

also am•biv′a•len•cy,



n.
uncertainty or fluctuation, esp. when caused by inability to make a choice or by a simultaneous desire to say or do two opposite things.
[1910–15]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ambivalence - mixed feelings or emotionsambivalence - mixed feelings or emotions    
feeling - the experiencing of affective and emotional states; "she had a feeling of euphoria"; "he had terrible feelings of guilt"; "I disliked him and the feeling was mutual"
conflict - opposition between two simultaneous but incompatible feelings; "he was immobilized by conflict and indecision"

ambivalence

noun indecision, doubt, opposition, conflict, uncertainty, contradiction, wavering, fluctuation, hesitancy, equivocation, vacillation, irresolution I've never hidden my ambivalence about getting married.
Translations
ambivalencijaambivalentnost

ambivalence

[æmˈbɪvələns] Nambivalencia f

ambivalence

[æmˈbɪvələns] nambivalence f
ambivalence about sth → ambivalence à propos de qch
ambivalence towards sb/sth → ambivalence envers qn/qch

ambivalence

nAmbivalenz f

ambivalence

[æmˈbɪvələns] nambivalenza

am·biv·a·lence

n. ambivalencia.

ambivalence

n ambivalencia
References in periodicals archive ?
In the 2003 election, there was little ambivalence to start with, so that the misestimations of prorata party support were small on the average in the last three polls of the campaign (see Table 1).
A person's voice can reveal many emotions: happiness, sadness, anger, even ambivalence.
Some of the mainstream press reacted with ambivalence and even hostility.
Ambivalence stage, the task is to resolve problems that interfere with participants' role commitments.
A person who makes a bedside decision to withdraw care from a dying loved one cannot but feel some ambivalence about the decision, even if they are convinced it is the right or best decision, all things considered, but it is difficult to express this ambivalence without seeming to draw back from the decision.
This association is illustrated, on the one hand, when depression is turned inward and manifests itself with symptoms of sadness, self-downing, apathy, hopelessness, helplessness, and ambivalence concerning living.
And, for us, just as importantly, the debate put away our nagging ambivalence about Kerry.
Meek's train motif, metaphorical at several levels, embraces the ambivalence of this journey in simple, insightful terms; ".
In the afterword, Hutner notes that the ambivalence attending the figure of Pocahontas, "interracial romance," and the woman-as-land metaphor has survived in our own day in "white American cultural texts," especially in American television programs and films, confirming "our ongoing anxieties about the blurring of gender, race, culture, and ethnicity" (109).
Both/and thinking can be especially useful for people who have been diagnosed with borderline personality disorder because it provides a way to handle the ambivalence and inner conflict that characterize that disorder.
One of the jobs of a biographer is to process ambivalence--both the author's ambivalence toward the subject and the subject's ambivalence toward the individuals in his or her life.
Local residents have reacted with ambivalence, with some exploiting the silencios by selling them maps, guides and refreshments; others, especially ranchers, would prefer the silencios to disappear.