ambivalently


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal.
Related to ambivalently: conferred, excitability, waylaid

am·biv·a·lent

 (ăm-bĭv′ə-lənt)
adj.
Exhibiting or feeling ambivalence.

am·biv′a·lent·ly adv.

ambivalently

(æmˈbɪvələntlɪ)
adv
in an ambivalent manner
Translations

ambivalently

[æmˈbɪvələntli] adv [feel, respond] → de façon ambivalente
References in periodicals archive ?
to connect with her fears about being engulfed by the trauma of Australian existence, about herself being the stolen child, about the difficulty of carrying the shame and burden of guilt, although this connection made ambivalently so.
Substance abuse is viewed ambivalently in society; thus, parents and helping professionals may have difficulty differentiating nonproblematic from problematic substance use (Nunes & Parson, 1995).
Similarly, mothers of ambivalently attached children are described as lacking in responsiveness and sensitivity to their children, and as being either too lenient or too controlling of their child (Egeland & Farber, 1984).
Divided into eight sections and arranged chronologically, this compendium contains a mini-library of data, documents, and discussions covering myriad topics, among them Black-Jewish relations seen as historical narratives and sociological analyses; and the dynamics of the recursive intertwining of creed, color, and class via cross-cultural borrowings (Blacks peopling their sacred music with Jewish characters; Jews imitating Blacks in entertainment; and Blacks ambivalently noting Jewish material success, Jewish racism, and Black antisemitism).
Just as the predominant public rhetoric shifted during the first half of the nineteenth century, from advocacy for peaceful race relations (however ambivalently avowed and haltingly implemented) to the openly sworn conviction of irreconcilable racial hostility,(58) this same progression has occurred in public discourse during the last half of this century regarding black-white relations.
Hammond and his high-tech cronies are treated more ambivalently, however, for it is mainly through their actions that the parable is presented.
Poor President Obama, trying to figure out if the Russians and Iranians are offering trick or treat to America on WMD, as he lurches about with a foreign policy played out extemporaneously and ambivalently in "Obama's brain and Ben Rhodes' mouth,'' as The New Republic's Leon Wieseltier puts it.
The collection consists of three parts: the contributions in Part I ("Origins, Paratexts, and Prototypes") deal with the artificiality of the ideas of birth and origin (Leander), paratextual author personae that hover ambivalently between the implied and the real author (Edelstein), and historical narratives about the war on terror (Hogan) and World War II (Carrard).
Loya shapes a provocative image of Liszt that is not so much cosmopolitan--that is, ambivalently vet still hierarchically assimilative--as it is transcultural, a concept which resists "the dichotomies (and implicitly Eurocentric) terms 'acculturation' (culture acquisition on the dominant culture's terms) and 'deculturation' (loss of culture)" (p.
The pairings suggested that the political consequences of holding separate from one another the narratives that animate these works and their reception narratives that alternatively valorize and denounce drug use and addiction, deride and uphold counterculture, and ambivalently gloss both commodity and racial fetishism--may outweigh the accomplishments we think we have made when we denounce one kind of production as complicit and exalt another as critical.
The novel thus dramatizes, although often ambivalently, the bank's central position within the culture and its role in the careful production of a particular version of its society's history.
They emerge from the crucible of movement changed -- whether for the good, as at the end of Homer's "Odyssey" (our granddaddy of travel narratives) or more ambivalently, as at the conclusion of Joseph Conrad's "Heart of Darkness.