amoeba

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a·moe·ba

also a·me·ba (ə-mē′bə)
n. pl. a·moe·bas or a·moe·bae (-bē) also a·me·bas or a·me·bae
Any of various one-celled free-living or parasitic protozoans having no definite form and moving by means of pseudopods.

[New Latin Amoeba, genus name, from Greek amoibē, change, from ameibein, to change; see mei- in Indo-European roots.]

a·moe′bic (-bĭk) adj.

amoeba

(əˈmiːbə) or

ameba

n, pl -bae (-biː) or -bas
(Animals) any protozoan of the phylum Rhizopoda, esp any of the genus Amoeba, able to change shape because of the movements of cell processes (pseudopodia). They live in fresh water or soil or as parasites in man and animals
[C19: from New Latin, from Greek amoibē change, from ameibein to change, exchange]
aˈmoebic, aˈmebic adj

a•me•ba

or a•moe•ba

(əˈmi bə)

n., pl. -bas, -bae (-bē).
1. any of numerous one-celled aquatic or parasitic protozoa of the order Amoebida, having a jellylike mass of cytoplasm that forms temporary pseudopodia, by which the organism moves and engulfs food particles.
2. a protozoan of the genus Amoeba, inhabiting bottom vegetation of freshwater ponds and streams: used widely in laboratory studies.
[1875–80; < New Latin amoeba < Greek amoibḗ change, alteration, n. derivative of ameíbein to exchange]
a•me′bic, adj.
a•me′boid, adj.

a·moe·ba

(ə-mē′bə)
Plural amoebas or amoebae (ə-mē′bē)
A one-celled microscopic organism that constantly changes shape by forming pseudopods, temporary projections that are used for movement and for the ingestion of food. Amoebas are members of the group of organisms called protozoans.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.amoeba - naked freshwater or marine or parasitic protozoa that form temporary pseudopods for feeding and locomotionamoeba - naked freshwater or marine or parasitic protozoa that form temporary pseudopods for feeding and locomotion
rhizopod, rhizopodan - protozoa characterized by a pseudopod
Amoebida, Amoebina, order Amoebida, order Amoebina - the animal order including amoebas
endameba - any ameba of the genus Endamoeba
Translations
амеба
amøbe
amööb
amebat
ameba
amőba
amebaamoeba
amöba

amoeba

[əˈmiːbə] N (amoebas (amoebae (pl))) [əˈmiːbiː]ameba f, amiba f

amoeba

[əˈmiːbə] (British) ameba (US) namibe f

amoeba

, (US) ameba
nAmöbe f

amoeba

ameba (Am) [əˈmiːbə] nameba

amoeba

, ameba
n. ameba, organismo de una sola célula.

amoeba

n (pl -bae o -bas) ameba or amiba
References in periodicals archive ?
fowleri amebae in Karachi's water supply are limited, but consistent annual reemergence of PAM in patients without history of recreational water exposure raises concerns about Karachi's water supply.
Free-living amebae belonging to the genus Acanthamoeba are found worldwide in air, dust, and water and are relatively resistant to normal levels of chlorine in tap water.
Amebae are aspirated into the nasal cavity through swimming, splashing, or nasal irrigation, and after attaching to the nasal mucosa, migrate across the cribriform plate to the brain via the olfactory nerves, causing extensive damage to the frontal lobes of the brain (1).
Amebae and ciliated protozoa as causal agents of waterborne zoonotic disease.
Free-living amebae of the genera Acanthamoeba, Balamuthia, Naegleria, and Sappinia are rare causes of infectious diseases in humans, with the exception of Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK), which is reported in more than one to two cases per 1 million contact lens wearers in the US annually.
Ultra-structure and Biometry of three Lobose Testate amebae of the family Lesquereusiidae (Tubulinea: Arcellinida) based on specimens from Sao Paulo, Brazil.
After informed consent was obtained, venous samples were drawn by a registered nurse or physician and sent to CDC's Free-living Amebae Laboratory for analysis.
Using a high-throughput screen for drugs developed by them, a collaborative group of scientists from UC San Diego School of Medicine, UC San Francisco and Wake Forest School of Medicine discovered that auranofin - a drug approved by the US Food and Drug Administration 25 years ago for rheumatoid arthritis - is very effective in targeting an enzyme that protects amebae from oxygen attack (thus enhancing sensitivity of the amebae to reactive oxygen-mediated killing).
Therefore, stool microscopy or antigen detection in stool samples is not helpful for diagnosis: less than 10% of patients have identifiable amebae in stool.
The immune response to Naegleria fowleri amebae and pathogenesis of infection.
Free-living amebae (FLA) are a large group of organisms with worldwide distribution.
Parasites found on the exterior of the host are called ectoparasites (such as lice or fleas), whereas those found inside the host are called endoparasites (such as worms, amebae, and malaria protozoa) (Figure 6-1A and B).