amoeba

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a·moe·ba

also a·me·ba (ə-mē′bə)
n. pl. a·moe·bas or a·moe·bae (-bē) also a·me·bas or a·me·bae
Any of various one-celled free-living or parasitic protozoans having no definite form and moving by means of pseudopods.

[New Latin Amoeba, genus name, from Greek amoibē, change, from ameibein, to change; see mei- in Indo-European roots.]

a·moe′bic (-bĭk) adj.

amoeba

(əˈmiːbə) or

ameba

n, pl -bae (-biː) or -bas
(Animals) any protozoan of the phylum Rhizopoda, esp any of the genus Amoeba, able to change shape because of the movements of cell processes (pseudopodia). They live in fresh water or soil or as parasites in man and animals
[C19: from New Latin, from Greek amoibē change, from ameibein to change, exchange]
aˈmoebic, aˈmebic adj

a•me•ba

or a•moe•ba

(əˈmi bə)

n., pl. -bas, -bae (-bē).
1. any of numerous one-celled aquatic or parasitic protozoa of the order Amoebida, having a jellylike mass of cytoplasm that forms temporary pseudopodia, by which the organism moves and engulfs food particles.
2. a protozoan of the genus Amoeba, inhabiting bottom vegetation of freshwater ponds and streams: used widely in laboratory studies.
[1875–80; < New Latin amoeba < Greek amoibḗ change, alteration, n. derivative of ameíbein to exchange]
a•me′bic, adj.
a•me′boid, adj.

a·moe·ba

(ə-mē′bə)
Plural amoebas or amoebae (ə-mē′bē)
A one-celled microscopic organism that constantly changes shape by forming pseudopods, temporary projections that are used for movement and for the ingestion of food. Amoebas are members of the group of organisms called protozoans.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.amoeba - naked freshwater or marine or parasitic protozoa that form temporary pseudopods for feeding and locomotionamoeba - naked freshwater or marine or parasitic protozoa that form temporary pseudopods for feeding and locomotion
rhizopod, rhizopodan - protozoa characterized by a pseudopod
Amoebida, Amoebina, order Amoebida, order Amoebina - the animal order including amoebas
endameba - any ameba of the genus Endamoeba
Translations
амеба
amøbe
amööb
amebat
ameba
amőba
amebaamoeba
amöba

amoeba

[əˈmiːbə] N (amoebas (amoebae (pl))) [əˈmiːbiː]ameba f, amiba f

amoeba

[əˈmiːbə] (British) ameba (US) namibe f

amoeba

, (US) ameba
nAmöbe f

amoeba

ameba (Am) [əˈmiːbə] nameba

amoeba

, ameba
n. ameba, organismo de una sola célula.

amoeba

n (pl -bae o -bas) ameba or amiba
References in periodicals archive ?
After an indolent, subacute phase with aspecific symptoms, the amebae invade the central nervous system, and illness rapidly progresses, leading almost invariably to death (7).
Amebae and ciliated protozoa as causal agents of waterborne zoonotic disease.
After informed consent was obtained, venous samples were drawn by a registered nurse or physician and sent to CDC's Free-living Amebae Laboratory for analysis.
Using a high-throughput screen for drugs developed by them, a collaborative group of scientists from UC San Diego School of Medicine, UC San Francisco and Wake Forest School of Medicine discovered that auranofin - a drug approved by the US Food and Drug Administration 25 years ago for rheumatoid arthritis - is very effective in targeting an enzyme that protects amebae from oxygen attack (thus enhancing sensitivity of the amebae to reactive oxygen-mediated killing).
The immune response to Naegleria fowleri amebae and pathogenesis of infection.
Known since classical times, the infection was linked to amebae by Fedor Aleksandrovich Losch in 1875.
hominis was originally considered a yeast, but now is grouped with the amebae.
Originally isolated from the brain of a mandrill that died of meningoencephalitis at the San Diego Zoo, Balamuthia mandrillaris is named for the late professor William Balamuth of the University of California at Berkeley, for his contributions to the study of amebae.
Free-living, amphizoic amebae of genera Naegleria, Acanthamoeba, and Balamuthia can cause central nervous system infection in humans.
Cases have been caused by emerging pathogens, including West Nile virus (WNV) (7, 8), rabies virus (9), lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) (10), and Balamuthia mandrillaris amebae (11).