amelia


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Related to amelia: Amelia Earhart

amelia

(əˈmiːlɪə)
n
(Pathology) pathol the congenital absence of arms or legs
[from a-1 + Greek melos limb + -ia]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.amelia - congenital absence of an arm or legamelia - congenital absence of an arm or leg
Translations
Amalia
Amelia
References in classic literature ?
The leading spirit of the three sisters was Miss Amelia.
Amelia put the questions when the servant appeared.
Miss Amelia addressed him as soon as the servant had left the room.
MADAM,--After her six years' residence at the Mall, I have the honour and happiness of presenting Miss Amelia Sedley to her parents, as a young lady not unworthy to occupy a fitting position in their polished and refined circle.
In leaving the Mall, Miss Amelia carries with her the hearts of her companions, and the affectionate regards of her mistress, who has the honour to subscribe herself,
Now, Miss Amelia Sedley was a young lady of this singular species; and deserved not only all that Miss Pinkerton said in her praise, but had many charming qualities which that pompous old Minerva of a woman could not see, from the differences of rank and age between her pupil and herself.
Amelia and Agatha may do for Maria and me, but here is nothing for your sister, Mr.
But this was immediately opposed by Tom Bertram, who asserted the part of Amelia to be in every respect the property of Miss Crawford, if she would accept it.
Amelia is a character more difficult to be well represented than even Agatha.
Without having been in the school of the Abbe Faria, the worthy master of The Young Amelia (the name of the Genoese tartan) knew a smattering of all the tongues spoken on the shores of that large lake called the Mediterranean, from the Arabic to the Provencal, and this, while it spared him interpreters, persons always troublesome and frequently indiscreet, gave him great facilities of communication, either with the vessels he met at sea, with the small boats sailing along the coast, or with the people without name, country, or occupation, who are always seen on the quays of seaports, and who live by hidden and mysterious means which we must suppose to be a direct gift of providence, as they have no visible means of support.
The master of The Young Amelia, who was very desirous of retaining amongst his crew a man of Edmond's value, had offered to advance him funds out of his future profits, which Edmond had accepted.
The Young Amelia had a very active crew, very obedient to their captain, who lost as little time as possible.