amenability


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a·me·na·ble

 (ə-mē′nə-bəl, ə-mĕn′ə-)
adj.
1.
a. Willing to accept a suggestion or submit to authority: "a class that is all the more amenable to control for living perpetually under the threat of deportation" (Amitav Ghosh).
b. Ready to consent; agreeable: Are you amenable to a change in schedule?
2. Responsible to higher authority; accountable: amenable to the law. See Synonyms at responsible.
3. Susceptible or open, as to testing or criticism: "The phenomenon of mind ... is much more complex, though also more amenable to scientific investigation, than anyone suspected" (Michael D. Lemonick).

[Probably alteration of Middle English menable, from Old French, from mener, to lead, from Latin mināre, to drive, from minārī, to threaten, from minae, threats; see men- in Indo-European roots.]

a·me′na·bil′i·ty, a·me′na·ble·ness n.
a·me′na·bly adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.amenability - the trait of being cooperativeamenability - the trait of being cooperative  
tractability, tractableness, flexibility - the trait of being easily persuaded

amenability

noun
The quality or state of willingly carrying out the wishes of others:
Translations

amenability

n (= responsiveness: of people) → Zugänglichkeit f; the amenability of these data to the theorydie Möglichkeit, diese Daten in die Theorie einzuordnen
References in periodicals archive ?
Both the Knelson Concentrator test-work and the Gekko Python amenability test-work conclude that the Old Pirate material is able to yield extremely high gravity gold recoveries.
Decisions about juvenile and adult offenders that are based on faulty assumptions about violence risk, and treatment amenability have adverse consequences, both for individual offenders and the public," she added.
Under the conditions of the reform, state supervising bodies' amenability to their unlawful actions will be considerably increased.
Eight related articles are also included, on such topics as the Stone and Loomis-Sikorski representation theorems, compactification and metriation, and amenability.
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McCausland's character and amenability to rehabilitation.
His focus is not on how to treat the various disorders, but on the amenability of each to amelioration by any method of therapy whatsoever, with which kinds of patients therapy is likely to succeed, and with which failure is almost a certainty.
Amenability to treatment and a review of the offender's legal status and history is reviewed with the treatment team in preparation for his entry into the program.
When does the commitment to training become excessive exercise, the pursuit of excellence become perfectionism, amenability to coaching become overcompliance, and the endurance of pain become denial of discomfort?
According to Michael Daly of the Department of Pathology at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences in Bethesda, Maryland, who collaborated in the research, this amenability has already enabled him and colleagues "to introduce bioremediating gene functions into D.
In addition to the animals' amenability, the lay of the land lends itself to research into animal behavior.