amenably


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a·me·na·ble

 (ə-mē′nə-bəl, ə-mĕn′ə-)
adj.
1.
a. Willing to accept a suggestion or submit to authority: "a class that is all the more amenable to control for living perpetually under the threat of deportation" (Amitav Ghosh).
b. Ready to consent; agreeable: Are you amenable to a change in schedule?
2. Responsible to higher authority; accountable: amenable to the law. See Synonyms at responsible.
3. Susceptible or open, as to testing or criticism: "The phenomenon of mind ... is much more complex, though also more amenable to scientific investigation, than anyone suspected" (Michael D. Lemonick).

[Probably alteration of Middle English menable, from Old French, from mener, to lead, from Latin mināre, to drive, from minārī, to threaten, from minae, threats; see men- in Indo-European roots.]

a·me′na·bil′i·ty, a·me′na·ble·ness n.
a·me′na·bly adv.
References in periodicals archive ?
As a literary theme that is common, the issue of sex(uality) has engaged the attention of authors across various genres and still presents itself amenably to whatever figurative or literal technique that is desired (or designed) by the writer.
However, to make transition as easy as possible for Park Place residents, the firm launched an incentive program as a means to encourage residents to vacate early and amenably.
They are only infrequently camped out on the front porch amenably awaiting the arrival of a process server.
Nothing is exposed of the gallery's material base or ideological operations, for these no longer serve as the hidden source of the work's truth; rather, the space is treated as an amenably generic set for dark fantasizing.