amiss


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Idioms.
Related to amiss: Amish, go amiss, AIIMS

a·miss

 (ə-mĭs′)
adj.
1. Out of proper order: What is amiss?
2. Not in perfect shape; faulty.
adv.
In an improper, defective, unfortunate, or mistaken way.

[Middle English amis, probably from Old Norse ā mis, so as to miss : ā, on; see an- in Indo-European roots + mis, act of missing; see mei- in Indo-European roots.]

amiss

(əˈmɪs)
adv
1. in an incorrect, inappropriate, or defective manner
2. take something amiss to be annoyed or offended by something
adj
(postpositive) wrong, incorrect, or faulty
[C13 a mis, from mis wrong; see miss1]

a•miss

(əˈmɪs)

adv.
1. out of the right or proper course, order, or condition; wrongly: to speak amiss.
adj.
2. improper; wrong; faulty.
Idioms:
take amiss, to be mistakenly offended at or resentful of; misunderstand.
[1200–50; Middle English amis=a- a-1 + mis wrong. See miss1]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.amiss - not functioning properlyamiss - not functioning properly; "something is amiss"; "has gone completely haywire"; "something is wrong with the engine"
malfunctioning, nonfunctional - not performing or able to perform its regular function; "a malfunctioning valve"
Adv.1.amiss - away from the correct or expected courseamiss - away from the correct or expected course; "something has gone awry in our plans"; "something went badly amiss in the preparations"
2.amiss - in an improper or mistaken or unfortunate manner; "if you think him guilty you judge amiss"; "he spoke amiss"; "no one took it amiss when she spoke frankly"
3.amiss - in an imperfect or faulty wayamiss - in an imperfect or faulty way; "The lobe was imperfectly developed"; "Miss Bennet would not play at all amiss if she practiced more"- Jane Austen

amiss

adjective wrong, mistaken, confused, false, inappropriate, rotten, incorrect, faulty, inaccurate, unsuitable, improper, defective, out of order, awry, erroneous, untoward, fallacious Their instincts warned them something was amiss.
wrong right, true, perfect, in order, correct, appropriate, suitable, accurate, proper, O.K. or okay (informal)
not go amiss be welcome, be appropriate, go down well A bit of kindness wouldn't go amiss.
take something amiss as an insult, wrongly, as offensive, out of turn He took it amiss when I asked to speak to someone else.

amiss

adjective
Not in accordance with what is usual or expected:
adverb
Not in the right way or on the proper course:
Translations
بِطَريقَة خاطِئَه
špatný
forkertgal
úr lagi
blogasnesėkmingas
kļūdainsnepareizs

amiss

[əˈmɪs]
A. ADJ there's something amisspasa algo
something is amiss in your calculationsalgo falla en tus cálculos
have I said something amiss?¿he dicho algo inoportuno?
there was nothing amiss that I could seepor lo que vi, todo estaba bien
B. ADV don't take it amiss, will you?no lo tomes a malno te vayas a ofender
a lick of paint wouldn't go or come amissuna mano de pintura no vendría mal
a little politeness wouldn't go or come amissun poco de educación no estaría de más, no vendría mal un poco de educación

amiss

[əˈmɪs]
adj
there is something amiss, something is amiss → il y a quelque chose qui ne va pas, il y a quelque chose qui cloche, quelque chose ne va pas
something is amiss with sb/sth → il y a quelque chose qui cloche avec qn/qch
there is nothing amiss → il n'y a rien qui cloche
nothing is amiss with sb/sth → il n'y a rien qui cloche avec qn/qch
adv
to take sth amiss → prendre qch mal, prendre qch de travers
sth would not go amiss, sth would not come amiss (British)qch ne ferait pas de mal

amiss

adj pred there’s something amissda stimmt irgendetwas nicht; what’s amiss with you? (liter)was fehlt Ihnen (denn)?
adv to take something amiss (Brit) → (jdm) etw übel nehmen; to speak amiss of somebodyschlecht über jdn sprechen; to say something amissetwas Falsches or Verkehrtes sagen; a drink would not come or go amissetwas zu trinken wäre gar nicht verkehrt

amiss

[əˈmɪs] adj & adv there's something amissc'è qualcosa che non quadra
don't take it amiss → non avertene a male

amiss

(əˈmis) adjective
wrong. Their plans went amiss.
References in classic literature ?
And pretending to be sorry for all that she had done amiss, Meed confessed her sins and was forgiven.
But there were few there so wise as to know the way thither, and they went all amiss.
You will not take it amiss if I express my strong disapproval of your allowing yourself, on any pretense whatever, to be mixed up for the future with your sister's proceedings.
I don't understand you, Arthur (at least I hope I don't): pray tell me what I have done or said amiss.
Nothing came amiss to them, from Manchester cotton manufactures to Smyrna figs.
As there are very many species of democracies, as well as of other states, it will not be amiss to consider at the same time anything which we may have omitted to mention concerning either of them, and to allot to each that mode of conduct which is peculiar to and advantageous for them; and also to inquire into the combinations of all these different modes of government which we [1317a] have mentioned; for as these are blended together the government is altered, as from an aristocracy to be an oligarchy, and from a free state to be a democracy.
Perhaps it is only by a kink in my nature, strong in me even in those days, that I felt in such an existence, the share of the great majority, something amiss.
But his strength soon began to fail him, and looking about him, conscious of having said much that was amiss, he again got into his caleche and drove back in silence.
There was something amiss with Mr Lightwood, for he was strangely grave and looked ill.
This was especially to be remarked if any one attempted to impose upon, or domineer over, his favourite: he was painfully jealous lest a word should be spoken amiss to him; seeming to have got into his head the notion that, because he liked Heathcliff, all hated, and longed to do him an ill-turn.
And because these cunning men, are like haberdashers of small wares, it is not amiss to set forth their shop.
I would write to him myself, but have mislaid his direction; and, as I hinted above, am afraid he took something in my conduct amiss.