amoeba

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Related to amoebae: paramecia, paramecium, Ciliates, Entamoeba histolytica, Naegleria fowleri

a·moe·ba

also a·me·ba (ə-mē′bə)
n. pl. a·moe·bas or a·moe·bae (-bē) also a·me·bas or a·me·bae
Any of various one-celled free-living or parasitic protozoans having no definite form and moving by means of pseudopods.

[New Latin Amoeba, genus name, from Greek amoibē, change, from ameibein, to change; see mei- in Indo-European roots.]

a·moe′bic (-bĭk) adj.

amoeba

(əˈmiːbə) or

ameba

n, pl -bae (-biː) or -bas
(Animals) any protozoan of the phylum Rhizopoda, esp any of the genus Amoeba, able to change shape because of the movements of cell processes (pseudopodia). They live in fresh water or soil or as parasites in man and animals
[C19: from New Latin, from Greek amoibē change, from ameibein to change, exchange]
aˈmoebic, aˈmebic adj

a•me•ba

or a•moe•ba

(əˈmi bə)

n., pl. -bas, -bae (-bē).
1. any of numerous one-celled aquatic or parasitic protozoa of the order Amoebida, having a jellylike mass of cytoplasm that forms temporary pseudopodia, by which the organism moves and engulfs food particles.
2. a protozoan of the genus Amoeba, inhabiting bottom vegetation of freshwater ponds and streams: used widely in laboratory studies.
[1875–80; < New Latin amoeba < Greek amoibḗ change, alteration, n. derivative of ameíbein to exchange]
a•me′bic, adj.
a•me′boid, adj.

a·moe·ba

(ə-mē′bə)
Plural amoebas or amoebae (ə-mē′bē)
A one-celled microscopic organism that constantly changes shape by forming pseudopods, temporary projections that are used for movement and for the ingestion of food. Amoebas are members of the group of organisms called protozoans.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.amoeba - naked freshwater or marine or parasitic protozoa that form temporary pseudopods for feeding and locomotionamoeba - naked freshwater or marine or parasitic protozoa that form temporary pseudopods for feeding and locomotion
rhizopod, rhizopodan - protozoa characterized by a pseudopod
Amoebida, Amoebina, order Amoebida, order Amoebina - the animal order including amoebas
endameba - any ameba of the genus Endamoeba
Translations
амеба
amøbe
amööb
amebat
ameba
amőba
amebaamoeba
amöba

amoeba

[əˈmiːbə] N (amoebas (amoebae (pl))) [əˈmiːbiː]ameba f, amiba f

amoeba

[əˈmiːbə] (British) ameba (US) namibe f

amoeba

, (US) ameba
nAmöbe f

amoeba

ameba (Am) [əˈmiːbə] nameba

amoeba

, ameba
n. ameba, organismo de una sola célula.

amoeba

n (pl -bae o -bas) ameba or amiba
References in periodicals archive ?
Free-living amoebae are the main route for spread and replication of legionellae in the environment, and infection of humans generally occurs via amoebae as vectors.
Before you scoff at a book review or the book about amoebae themselves, let me draw your attention to a few statistics regarding small beings: 1) a mere cup of seawater contains 100 million cells, 2) every year more than 50 million tons of fungal spores are released into our atmosphere, and 3) your GI tract is the home to 500 to 1,000 species of bacteria.
PARASITIC AMOEBAE OF THE CTENOPHORE MNEMIOPSIS LEIDYI.
Experiments with amoebae that usually live as individuals but must also join with others to form multicellular bodies to complete their life cycles showed that cooperation depends on kinship.
Acanthamoeba, a genus of amoebae is one of the most common protozoa in soil, and also frequently found in fresh water and other habitats.
About a third of the amoebae studied performed the role of "farmers", said the researchers writing in the journal Nature.
London, Jan 20 (ANI): Some amoebae do exactly what we do before we travel - pack a lunch.
The topics include collecting and processing water samples, using the new DNA-amplification technique loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) for the low-cost screening of multiple waterborne pathogens, amoebae as tools to isolate amoeba-resisting microorganisms from environmental samples, detecting viable organisms and functional gene expression using molecular techniques, characterizing microbial community structures in recreational waters and primary sources of fecal pollution with a next-generation sequencing approach, and microbial bioreporter sensing technologies for chemical and biological detection.
Evolution skeptics also claim that no one has ever seen the development of a new species, a myth Farmer and Habura tackle by outlining a case in which amoebae became symbiotically dependent upon infecting bacteria.
To hear Mark Mazzola describe his latest discovery in the weird, wild world of microorganisms, you'd think the amoebae he's been studying--and the bacteria they stalk in the soil--were lion and wildebeest locked in an epic battle for survival on the plains of the Serengeti in East Africa.
In every sample, there are tens of thousands of protists, including amoebae, ciliates, foraminiferans, flagellates, and dinoflagellates.