amoral


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a·mor·al

 (ā-môr′əl, ā-mŏr′-)
adj.
1. Not admitting of moral distinctions or judgments; neither moral nor immoral.
2. Lacking moral sensibility; not caring about right and wrong.

a·mor′al·ism n.
a′mo·ral′i·ty (ā′mô-răl′ĭ-tē, -mə-) n.
a·mor′al·ly adv.

amoral

(eɪˈmɒrəl)
adj
1. having no moral quality; nonmoral
2. without moral standards or principles
amorality n
aˈmorally adv
Usage: Amoral is often wrongly used where immoral is meant. Immoral is properly used to talk about the breaking of moral rules, amoral about people who have no moral code or about places or situations where moral considerations do not apply

a•mor•al

(eɪˈmɔr əl, æˈmɔr-, eɪˈmɒr-, æˈmɒr-)

adj.
1. without moral quality; neither moral nor immoral.
2. lacking or indifferent to moral standards, criteria, or principles.
[1880–85]
a•mo•ral•i•ty (ˌeɪ məˈræl ɪ ti, ˌæm ə-) n.
a•mor′al•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:

amoral

adjective unethical, nonmoral, unvirtuous The film was violent and amoral.
Usage: Amoral is sometimes confused with immoral. The a- at the beginning of the word means `without' or `lacking', so the word is properly used of people who have no moral code, or about places or situations where moral considerations do not apply: the film was violent and amoral. In contrast immoral should be used to talk about the breaking of moral rules, as in: drug dealing is the most immoral and evil of all human activities.
Translations
amoralan

amoral

[eɪˈmɒrəl] ADJamoral

amoral

[ˌeɪˈmɒrəl] adj [person, character] → amoral(e); [action, attitude] → amoral(e)

amoral

adjamoralisch

amoral

[eɪˈmɒrəl] adjamorale
References in periodicals archive ?
He launched him into the hard-drinking, amoral Soho of the '60s, he wined and dined him, and he took him abroad; he made him the subject of paintings which, if incomprehensible to Dyer, appealed to his need for attention.
He transplants the narrative from medieval Germany to contemporary, amoral, sex-crazed London, and--the most startling of innovations--he recasts the swans as men.
Bring in Heather Locklear, a veteran from Spelling's 1980s hit series Dynasty, to play the part of a scheming, conniving, amoral advertising
Machiavelli, who had been imprisoned for backing the wrong corporate venture at some unfortunate point in his career history, decided to offer his boss a brief, punchy and completely amoral how-to on the central issues of senior management.
The Catholic Church said: "Helping young people to bypass the age of consent legislation is to collude in the creation of an amoral society.
Amoral, sociopathic, totally confident and utterly without fear.
Amoral villain Harry Starks - the wonderful Mark Strong, right - sailed off into the future after managing to royally screw up the lives of everyone around him.
The ICC has adopted a fundamentally amoral position supported by draconian powers.
In the end, the republic was swept away in the fires of civil war, and Julius Caesar--the very prototype of the amoral, charismatic, ruthless dictator--came to power.
It's an amoral trade that enriches only a few in the West but which, according to UN studies, accounts for 95 percent of all the dying and suffering in global conflict.
These elves, dryads, trolls, dwarves, and the like have never seemed to hate anyone; they're just sort of amoral.
Even so, the Renaissance villa "was not an entirely moral dwelling," Boyle writes, but also a place of scheming and amoral machinating behind varying degrees of walled privacy and privilege, where women had only marginal roles at best (156).