amoralism


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a·mor·al

 (ā-môr′əl, ā-mŏr′-)
adj.
1. Not admitting of moral distinctions or judgments; neither moral nor immoral.
2. Lacking moral sensibility; not caring about right and wrong.

a·mor′al·ism n.
a′mo·ral′i·ty (ā′mô-răl′ĭ-tē, -mə-) n.
a·mor′al·ly adv.

amoralism

(ˌeɪˈmɒrəlɪzəm)
n
the doctrine or attitude that ignores or rejects moral vaues, or deems them to be irrelevant

amoralism

the state or quality of being without morality or of being indifferent to moral standards. — amoralist, n. — amoral, adj.
See also: Ethics
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.amoralism - the doctrine that moral distinctions are invalid
doctrine, ism, philosophical system, philosophy, school of thought - a belief (or system of beliefs) accepted as authoritative by some group or school
References in periodicals archive ?
How, notably, can we avoid slipping into some sort of Nietzschean relativism or amoralism in international affairs?
Korsgaard, "Skepticism about Practical Reason," 15; Smith, The Moral Problem, 12, 61; van Roojen, "Moral Rationalism and Rational Amoralism," 499.
supposed utilitarian benefits of late-nineteenth-century amoralism,
Thirdly, they shed light on debates over amoralism and lend some support to a picture of normative psychology that links normative judgment constitutively to motivation.
George Orwell tambien critico estos versos en su ensayo Inside the Whale: "Mr Auden's brand of amoralism is only possible, if you are the kind of person who is always somewhere else when the trigger is pulled" (238).
At the time, the deputy called Christofides "the rector of illegal practice, lawlessness, amoralism, nepotism and having things done because that's what he wants.
The writer and activist French priest Felicite de Lammenais (1782-1854), who influenced Cabet, drew upon an early version of the "social gospel" and a long history of collectivist Catholic confraternities to argue against what he considered the amoralism of capitalism and to advocate a return to what would later be called a "moral economy.
How telling that even a thinker as committed to moral universality as Frohnen should be prone to a kind of partial amoralism or immoralism
Finally, while all of this may sound like a recipe for a kind of Machiavellian amoralism, Rand argues, at least on the interpretation that I will be presupposing here, that the result of this kind of approach is the endorsement of a set of largely, though not entirely, familiar and traditional moral virtues.
He considers Jesus' moral message on proper family relations, associating and identifying with pariahs, forgiveness, and material simplicity; Nietzsche's perspectivism, his genealogical critiques, master/slave moralities, psychological philosophy, amoralism, and proclamation that God is dead; Jesus' understanding of unconditional love and Nietzsche's understanding of the will to power; and Jesus' and Nietzsche's respectively perfectionist and aristocratic visions of the good human life and how to value it.
13) Mandeville's overt statement that the absence of self-love is the death of progress, also, and even Smith's complication of Mandeville's crude economic amoralism, seem to converge at this point with Hobbes and Locke.
54) on the other hand, the amoralism of Anglo-American contract law (like the related claim of the no-fault aspect of Anglo-American contract law) is easy to overstate.