amortize


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am·or·tize

 (ăm′ər-tīz′, ə-môr′-)
tr.v. am·or·tized, am·or·tiz·ing, am·or·tiz·es
1. To liquidate (a debt, such as a mortgage) by installment payments or payment into a sinking fund.
2. To write off an expenditure for (an asset, especially an intangible one, such as a patent) by prorating over a certain period, usually the expected duration of the asset's benefit.

[Middle English amortisen, to alienate in mortmain, from Old French amortir, amortiss-, from Vulgar Latin *admortīre, to deaden : Latin ad-, ad- + Latin mors, mort-, death; see mer- in Indo-European roots.]

am′or·tiz′a·ble adj.

amortize

(əˈmɔːtaɪz) or

amortise

vb (tr)
1. (Banking & Finance) finance to liquidate (a debt, mortgage, etc) by instalment payments or by periodic transfers to a sinking fund
2. (Accounting & Book-keeping) to write off (a wasting asset) by annual transfers to a sinking fund
3. (Law) property law (formerly) to transfer (lands, etc) in mortmain
[C14: from Medieval Latin admortizāre, from Old French amortir to reduce to the point of death, ultimately from Latin ad to + mors death]
aˈmortizable, aˈmortisable adj

am•or•tize

(ˈæm ərˌtaɪz, əˈmɔr taɪz)

v.t. -tized, -tiz•ing.
1. to liquidate (a debt), esp. by periodic payments to the creditor.
2. to write off a cost of (an asset) gradually.
[1375–1425; < Anglo-French, Old French amortiss-, long s. of amortir literally, to kill, die < Vulgar Latin *a(d)mortīre=a-, ad- ad- + -mortīre, v. derivative of Latin mors, s. mort- death]
am′or•tiz`a•ble, adj.

amortize


Past participle: amortized
Gerund: amortizing

Imperative
amortize
amortize
Present
I amortize
you amortize
he/she/it amortizes
we amortize
you amortize
they amortize
Preterite
I amortized
you amortized
he/she/it amortized
we amortized
you amortized
they amortized
Present Continuous
I am amortizing
you are amortizing
he/she/it is amortizing
we are amortizing
you are amortizing
they are amortizing
Present Perfect
I have amortized
you have amortized
he/she/it has amortized
we have amortized
you have amortized
they have amortized
Past Continuous
I was amortizing
you were amortizing
he/she/it was amortizing
we were amortizing
you were amortizing
they were amortizing
Past Perfect
I had amortized
you had amortized
he/she/it had amortized
we had amortized
you had amortized
they had amortized
Future
I will amortize
you will amortize
he/she/it will amortize
we will amortize
you will amortize
they will amortize
Future Perfect
I will have amortized
you will have amortized
he/she/it will have amortized
we will have amortized
you will have amortized
they will have amortized
Future Continuous
I will be amortizing
you will be amortizing
he/she/it will be amortizing
we will be amortizing
you will be amortizing
they will be amortizing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been amortizing
you have been amortizing
he/she/it has been amortizing
we have been amortizing
you have been amortizing
they have been amortizing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been amortizing
you will have been amortizing
he/she/it will have been amortizing
we will have been amortizing
you will have been amortizing
they will have been amortizing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been amortizing
you had been amortizing
he/she/it had been amortizing
we had been amortizing
you had been amortizing
they had been amortizing
Conditional
I would amortize
you would amortize
he/she/it would amortize
we would amortize
you would amortize
they would amortize
Past Conditional
I would have amortized
you would have amortized
he/she/it would have amortized
we would have amortized
you would have amortized
they would have amortized
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.amortize - liquidate graduallyamortize - liquidate gradually      
liquidate, pay off - eliminate by paying off (debts)
Translations
amortisere

amortize

[əˈmɔːtaɪz] VTamortizar

amortize

[əˈmɔːrtaɪz] amortise (British) vt (= pay off) [+ debt, cost, expenses] → amortir

amortize

vt debtamortisieren, tilgen; costsamortisieren
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