anachronism


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a·nach·ro·nism

 (ə-năk′rə-nĭz′əm)
n.
1. The representation of someone as existing or something as happening in other than chronological, proper, or historical order.
2. One that is out of its proper or chronological order, especially a person or practice that belongs to an earlier time: "A new age had plainly dawned, an age that made the institution of a segregated picnic seem an anachronism" (Henry Louis Gates, Jr.).

[French anachronisme, from New Latin anachronismus, from Late Greek anakhronismos, from anakhronizesthai, to be an anachronism : Greek ana-, ana- + Greek khronizein, to take time (from khronos, time).]

a·nach′ro·nis′tic, a·nach′ro·nous (-nəs) adj.
a·nach′ro·nis′ti·cal·ly, a·nach′ro·nous·ly adv.

anachronism

(əˈnækrəˌnɪzəm)
n
1. the representation of an event, person, or thing in a historical context in which it could not have occurred or existed
2. a person or thing that belongs or seems to belong to another time: she regards the Church as an anachronism.
[C17: from Latin anachronismus, from Greek anakhronismos a mistake in chronology, from anakhronizein to err in a time reference, from ana- + khronos time]
aˌnachroˈnistic adj
aˌnachroˈnistically adv

a•nach•ro•nism

(əˈnæk rəˌnɪz əm)

n.
1. an error in chronology in which a person, object, event, etc., is assigned a date or period other than the correct one.
2. a thing or person that belongs to another, esp. an earlier, time.
[1640–50; < Latin anachronismus < Greek anachronismós a wrong time reference =anachron(ízein) to make a wrong time reference (see ana-, chrono-, -ize) + -ismos -ism]
a•nach`ro•nis′tic, a•nach′ro•nous, adj.
a•nach`ro•nis′ti•cal•ly, a•nach′ro•nous•ly, an•a•chron•i•cal•ly (ˌæn əˈkrɒn ɪk li) adv.

anachronism

1. a person or a thing remaining or appearing after its own time period; archaism.
2. an error in chronology. Also called antichronism. — anachronistic, anachronistical, anachronous, adj.
See also: Time
an error in chronology, as the placing of an event or figure in a period or scene in which it did not or could not belong. — anachronistic, adj.
See also: Literature
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.anachronism - something located at a time when it could not have existed or occurredanachronism - something located at a time when it could not have existed or occurred
timekeeping - the act or process of determining the time
2.anachronism - an artifact that belongs to another timeanachronism - an artifact that belongs to another time
artefact, artifact - a man-made object taken as a whole
3.anachronism - a person who seems to be displaced in timeanachronism - a person who seems to be displaced in time; who belongs to another age
unusual person, anomaly - a person who is unusual
Translations
анахронизъм
anakronismi
anakronizam

anachronism

[əˈnækrənɪzəm] Nanacronismo m

anachronism

[əˈnækrənɪzəm] nanachronisme m
a political anachronism → un anachronisme politique

anachronism

anachronism

[əˈnækrənɪzm] nanacronismo
References in classic literature ?
Why, in my own former day -- in remote centuries not yet stirring in the womb of time -- there were old Englishmen who imagined that they had been born in a free country: a "free" country with the Corporation Act and the Test still in force in it -- timbers propped against men's liberties and dishonored consciences to shore up an Established Anachronism with.
I do not pretend to plead the immunities of my order so highly as this; but neither will I allow that the author of a modern antique romance is obliged to confine himself to the introduction of those manners only which can be proved to have absolutely existed in the times he is depicting, so that he restrain himself to such as are plausible and natural, and contain no obvious anachronism.
My battery captain called me a Pachydermatous Anachronism the other day.
Only fancy, this was two years after his insult to me, and my challenge would have been a ridiculous anachronism, in spite of all the ingenuity of my letter in disguising and explaining away the anachronism.
The same anachronism is made later on in this book.
Who stupidly sealed that heavy anachronism of stone in the Carlovingian pavement of Hercandus?
You are too young--it is an anachronism for you to have such thoughts," said Will, energetically, with a quick shake of the head habitual to him.
Ward, and he shares no part of his being with any vagabond anachronism from the younger world.
And, finally, I am convinced that he is the perfect type of the primitive man, born a thousand years or generations too late and an anachronism in this culminating century of civilization.
Our ancestors had no great tolerance for anachronisms.
We may wonder whether at the acme and summit of the human progress these anachronisms will be corrected by a finer intuition, a close interaction of the social machinery than that which now jolts us round and along; but such completeness is not to be prophesied, or even conceived as possible.
Where Mr Lloyd George referred to the House of Lords as blithering backwoodsmen and asinine anachronisms, Mr Rackstraw scorned to be so guarded in his speech.