anagoge

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an·a·go·ge

also an·a·go·gy  (ăn′ə-gō′jē)
n. pl. an·a·go·ges also an·a·go·gies
A mystical interpretation of a word, passage, or text, especially scriptural exegesis that detects allusions to heaven or the afterlife.

[Late Latin anagōgē, from Late Greek, spiritual uplift, from anagein, to lift up : ana-, ana- + agein, to lead; see ag- in Indo-European roots.]

an′a·gog′ic (-gŏj′ĭk), an′a·gog′i·cal adj.
an′a·gog′i·cal·ly adv.

anagoge

(ˈænəˌɡɒdʒɪ) or

anagogy

n
1. allegorical or spiritual interpretation, esp of sacred works such as the Bible
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) Christianity allegorical interpretation of the Old Testament as typifying or foreshadowing subjects in the New Testament
[C18: via Late Latin from Greek anagōgē a lifting up, from anagein, from ana- + agein to lead]
anagogic, ˌanaˈgogical adj
ˌanaˈgogically adv

an•a•go•ge

(ˌæn əˈgoʊ dʒi, ˈæn əˌgoʊ-)

n.
a spiritual or mystical interpretation or use of words, esp. of Scripture.
[< Late Latin < Greek anagōgḗ an uplifting =an- an-3 + agōgḗ, feminine of agōgós leading; see -agogue]
an`a•gog′ic (-ˈgɒdʒ ɪk) adj.

anagoge, anagogy

1. Obsolete, a spiritual or mental elevation.
2. a mystical interpretation of a text (usually the Bible.) — anagogic, adj.anagogically, adv.
See also: Religion
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.anagoge - a mystical or allegorical interpretation (especially of Scripture)
interpretation, reading, version - a mental representation of the meaning or significance of something
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
In this sense he is a "figure" of Christ, but understood anagogically.
For I know a cleansing fire, which Christ came to send upon the earth, and he himself, anagogically speaking, is called fire.
Ruby's vision has had to be transformed from one that has been blind to supernatural significance to one that is able to see anagogically.
shows that Scripture provided the basis for medieval angelology, especially when read anagogically.
Percy shows Will wayfaring through a sacramental natural world that is an incarnational mystery full of signs and, anagogically, an expression of the Word that discloses whatever reality there is.
In these books Augustine links literal creation ecclesially, morally, and anagogically to the Word itself.
1:26-27's image and likeness as progression from participation in the characteristics of God's essence (for example, immortality) to participation in the characteristics of God's energies (for example, impassibility, patience); and humanity's mediatorial vocation predicated on its microcosmic nature; (3) Christ, who as the enfleshed (that is, passible) Logos is the deified and deifying corporeal bridge for the deification of all human beings, (4) the Church as a community of faith mediating grace especially through the corporeal acts of the sacraments; and (5) the Christian, especially the Christian's body--even that body's passibility--as an anagogically deifying gift of God.