analytical psychology


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to analytical psychology: Carl Jung, individual psychology

analytical psychology

n
(Psychoanalysis) a school of psychoanalysis founded by Jung as a result of disagreements with Freud. See also archetype, collective unconscious

analytical psychology

The process of attempting to explain or relieve disturbance by looking into the unconscious forces governing behavior. The term is also used more specifically to refer to the school of Carl Jung.
References in periodicals archive ?
He was the founder of analytical psychology and first proposed the idea of extrovert and introvert character types.
Research in Analytical Psychology and Jungian Studies
Despite some major differences, Carl Jung and Sigmund Freud, the two leading figures in analytical psychology, held similar views on the role and responsibilities of the ego in personality development.
Jung, was a Swiss psychiatrist and psychotherapist who founded analytical psychology.
She is a founding member and acting president of the Romanian Association for Analytical Psychology.
Journal of Analytical Psychology, Volume 50, Number 3, June 2005, pp.
Featuring a new and informative introduction by Kevin Lu, "Analytical Psychology" is a 240 page compendium comprised of five lectures on analytical psychology given by Jung in 1935 at the Tavistock Clinic in London, England.
The first part of the book is made up of eight essays: Romanticism and Revolution in Jung's Science; Science Friction: Jung, Goethe and Scientific Objectivity; Vicissitudes of a Science Complex; Speculations on Jung's Dream of Science; Explanations and Interpretation; Analytical Psychology, Narrative Theory and the Question of Science; Knowledge, Wisdom, and the Science-Complex in Orthodox Christianity and Jungian Psychology; and Jung's Relationship to Science and his Concept of Psychocultural Development.
As Swiss psychiatrist C G Jung, who founded analytical psychology, said, "Through pride, we are deceiving ourselves.
Jung, who struggled painfully to preserve his Catholic identity and intellectual convictions with his outreach to analytical psychology.
Whitmont, The symbolic Quest: Basic Concepts Analytical Psychology (New Jersey: Princeton University Press, 1969), pp.

Full browser ?