anapaest

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Related to anapaests: anapest

an·a·pest

also an·a·paest  (ăn′ə-pĕst′)
n.
1. A metrical foot composed of two unaccented syllables followed by one accented one, as in the word seventeen.
2. A metrical foot in quantitative verse composed of two short syllables followed by one long one.

[Latin anapaestus, from Greek anapaistos : ana-, ana- + paiein, pais-, to strike (so called because an anapest is a reversed dactyl); see pau- in Indo-European roots.]

an′a·pes′tic adj.

anapaest

(ˈænəpɛst; -piːst) or

anapest

n
(Poetry) prosody a metrical foot of three syllables, the first two short, the last long (˘˘¯)
[C17: via Latin from Greek anapaistos reversed (that is, a dactyl reversed), from anapaiein, from ana- back + paiein to strike]
ˌanaˈpaestic, ˌanaˈpestic, ˌanaˈpaestical adj
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.anapaest - a metrical unit with unstressed-unstressed-stressed syllables
metrical foot, metrical unit, foot - (prosody) a group of 2 or 3 syllables forming the basic unit of poetic rhythm
Translations

anapaest

anapest [ˈænəpiːst] Nanapesto m

anapaest

, (US) anapest
n (Poet) → Anapäst m
References in classic literature ?
Of the Choric part the Parode is the first undivided utterance of the Chorus: the Stasimon is a Choric ode without anapaests or trochaic tetrameters: the Commos is a joint lamentation of Chorus and actors.
Focusing here on choral song, classicists, philologists, and other scholars discuss such topics as Alcman's first Partheneion and the song the Sirens sang, the parrhesia of young female choruses in ancient Greece, a second look at the poetics of re-enactment in Ode 13 of Bacchylides, Pindar and the Aeginetan patrai, and choral self-awareness in the introductory anapaests of Aeschylus; Supplices.
Without pause, we are caught up in the momentum of events, swept along by the swinging iambs and anapaests, from the effeminate Carrier (traitor to republican virtu), to the Loire, to the kangaroo court where, before we can catch our breath, we have met "One rough with labour and red with fight, / And a lady noble by name and face," whom "the judge bade strip and ship them, and bind / Bosom to bosom, to drown and die" (ll.