anapaest

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Related to anapaests: anapest

an·a·pest

also an·a·paest  (ăn′ə-pĕst′)
n.
1. A metrical foot composed of two unaccented syllables followed by one accented one, as in the word seventeen.
2. A metrical foot in quantitative verse composed of two short syllables followed by one long one.

[Latin anapaestus, from Greek anapaistos : ana-, ana- + paiein, pais-, to strike (so called because an anapest is a reversed dactyl); see pau- in Indo-European roots.]

an′a·pes′tic adj.

anapaest

(ˈænəpɛst; -piːst) or

anapest

n
(Poetry) prosody a metrical foot of three syllables, the first two short, the last long (˘˘¯)
[C17: via Latin from Greek anapaistos reversed (that is, a dactyl reversed), from anapaiein, from ana- back + paiein to strike]
ˌanaˈpaestic, ˌanaˈpestic, ˌanaˈpaestical adj
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.anapaest - a metrical unit with unstressed-unstressed-stressed syllables
metrical foot, metrical unit, foot - (prosody) a group of 2 or 3 syllables forming the basic unit of poetic rhythm
Translations

anapaest

anapest [ˈænəpiːst] Nanapesto m

anapaest

, (US) anapest
n (Poet) → Anapäst m
References in classic literature ?
Of the Choric part the Parode is the first undivided utterance of the Chorus: the Stasimon is a Choric ode without anapaests or trochaic tetrameters: the Commos is a joint lamentation of Chorus and actors.
tis an anapaest of AEschylus which expresses grief perfectly.
When he set refined English words to Irish music, did Moore "transform his country's political aspirations into lilting anapaests," as Tom Paulin claims?
Focusing here on choral song, classicists, philologists, and other scholars discuss such topics as Alcman's first Partheneion and the song the Sirens sang, the parrhesia of young female choruses in ancient Greece, a second look at the poetics of re-enactment in Ode 13 of Bacchylides, Pindar and the Aeginetan patrai, and choral self-awareness in the introductory anapaests of Aeschylus; Supplices.
4) In classical Greek and Latin, dactyls, anapaests, iambs and so on were patterns of long and short syllables.
The metre moves in rapid anapaests through the detail of the horses' manes to the 'jolt' of electricity.
There are four stress-peaks to a line separated by an irregular mixture of iambics and anapaests.
15) Cedric Watts commented on the words I have italicized: "the calm sunset is described epically and sonorously, the phrases rolling into anapaests," see Watts (1977), 39.
In the first stanza, after two anapaests at lines 2-3, two amphibrachs (lines 4-5), the lines of the child, are interrupted by a choriamb (line 6), which serves to install the amphimacers of the worn dressing-gown (lines 7 and 9).
Some readers may not find them entirely enjoyable; still, it would take a pedant with a heart of flint to resist such touches as the description of anapaests in narrative verse showing 'all the unwelcome energy and boisterousness of hyperactive children' (121).
In the beginning of The Persians, the meter increases in tempo and intricacy within the first choral song from marching anapaests, a kind of deliberate and slow-paced recitative, ("of the Persians who've gone" v v - v v -),(17) through more melodic ionic meters, ("Persian city now is destroyed" v v - -v v - -)), to faster-moving trochaics ("blackened robe of mine" - v -v -).