anarchy


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Related to anarchy: anarchist, Anarchy Online

an·ar·chy

 (ăn′ər-kē)
n. pl. an·ar·chies
1. Absence of any form of political authority.
2. Political disorder and confusion.
3. Absence of any cohesive principle, such as a common standard or purpose.

[New Latin anarchia, from Greek anarkhiā, from anarkhos, without a ruler : an-, without; see a-1 + arkhos, ruler; see -arch.]

anarchy

(ˈænəkɪ)
n
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) general lawlessness and disorder, esp when thought to result from an absence or failure of government
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the absence or lack of government
3. the absence of any guiding or uniting principle; disorder; chaos
4. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the theory or practice of political anarchism
[C16: from Medieval Latin anarchia, from Greek anarkhia, from anarkhos without a ruler, from an- + arkh- leader, from arkhein to rule]
anarchic, anˈarchical adj
anˈarchically adv

an•ar•chy

(ˈæn ər ki)

n.
1. a state of society without government or law.
2. political and social disorder due to the absence of governmental control.
3. a theory that regards the absence of all direct or coercive government as a political ideal and that proposes the cooperative and voluntary association of individuals and groups as the principal mode of organized society.
4. confusion; chaos; disorder.
[1530–40; < Middle French anarchie or Medieval Latin anarchia < Greek anarchía lack of a leader]
an•ar•chic (ænˈɑr kɪk) an•ar′chi•cal, adj.
an•ar′chi•cal•ly, adv.

anarchy

an absence of government and law; political disorder, often accompanied by violence. See also order and disorder.
See also: Government
extreme disorder. See also government.
See also: Order and Disorder
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.anarchy - a state of lawlessness and disorder (usually resulting from a failure of government)anarchy - a state of lawlessness and disorder (usually resulting from a failure of government)
governing, government activity, government, governance, administration - the act of governing; exercising authority; "regulations for the governing of state prisons"; "he had considerable experience of government"
disorder - a disturbance of the peace or of public order
nihilism - complete denial of all established authority and institutions

anarchy

anarchy

noun
A lack of civil order or peace:
Translations
فَقْدَان الحُكْمفَوْضى
анархия
anarchiebezvládíchaoszmatek
anarkilovløshed
anarkia
anarhija
anarchia
stjórnleysi
anarchijaanarchistasanarchizmaschaosassuirutė
anarhijasajukums
anarhie
anarchiabezvládie
anarki
anarşikarışklık

anarchy

[ˈænəkɪ] N
1. (Pol) → anarquía f
2. (= chaos) → anarquía f

anarchy

[ˈænərki] n (= chaos, disorder) → anarchie f

anarchy

nAnarchie f

anarchy

[ˈænəkɪ] nanarchia

anarchy

(ˈӕnəki) noun
1. the absence or failure of government. Total anarchy followed the defeat of the government.
2. disorder and confusion.
ˈanarchist noun
1. a person who believes that governments are unnecessary or undesirable.
2. a person who tries to overturn the government by violence.
ˈanarchism noun
References in classic literature ?
At last Miss Wilson quelled the prevailing anarchy.
It discouraged the waste and anarchy of duplication.
Whoever rejects it does, of necessity, fly to anarchy or to despotism.
It is impossible to read the history of the petty republics of Greece and Italy without feeling sensations of horror and disgust at the distractions with which they were continually agitated, and at the rapid succession of revolutions by which they were kept in a state of perpetual vibration between the extremes of tyranny and anarchy.
In a society under the forms of which the stronger faction can readily unite and oppress the weaker, anarchy may as truly be said to reign as in a state of nature, where the weaker individual is not secured against the violence of the stronger; and as, in the latter state, even the stronger individuals are prompted, by the uncertainty of their condition, to submit to a government which may protect the weak as well as themselves; so, in the former state, will the more powerful factions or parties be gradnally induced, by a like motive, to wish for a government which will protect all parties, the weaker as well as the more powerful.
It proved, incontrovertibly, the disastrous effects of machinery and division of labour; the concentration of capital and land in a few hands; overproduction and crises; it pointed out the inevitable ruin of the petty bourgeois and peasant, the misery of the proletariat, the anarchy in production, the crying inequalities in the distribution of wealth, the industrial war of extermination between nations, the dissolution of old moral bonds, of the old family relations, of the old nationalities.
The agitation for the Universal Colour Bill continued for three years; and up to the last moment of that period it seemed as though Anarchy were destined to triumph.
But in hours of trial the junto of man's nature is dissolved, and anarchy succeeds.
Because in all cities these two distinct parties are found, and from this it arises that the people do not wish to be ruled nor oppressed by the nobles, and the nobles wish to rule and oppress the people; and from these two opposite desires there arises in cities one of three results, either a principality, self- government, or anarchy.
This is simply bringing anarchy into the army, and flinging victory away.
It is one of the most remarkable circumstances in our history, that, when the charter government was overthrown by the war, no anarchy nor the slightest confusion ensued, This was a great honor to the people.
While all this petty anarchy was agitating the little world within the Tonquin, the good ship prosperously pursued her course, doubled Cape Horn on the 25th of December, careered across the bosom of the Pacific, until, on the 11th of February, the snowy peaks of Owyhee were seen brightening above the horizon.