anatomy


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a·nat·o·my

 (ə-năt′ə-mē)
n. pl. a·nat·o·mies
1. The bodily structure of a plant or an animal or of any of its parts.
2. The science of the shape and structure of organisms and their parts.
3. A treatise on anatomic science.
4. Dissection of a plant or animal to study the structure, position, and interrelation of its various parts.
5. A skeleton.
6. The human body.
7. A detailed examination or analysis: the anatomy of a crime.

[Middle English anatomie, from Late Latin anatomia, from Greek anatomē, dissection : ana-, ana- + tomē, a cutting (from temnein, to cut; see tem- in Indo-European roots).]

anatomy

(əˈnætəmɪ)
n, pl -mies
1. (Anatomy) the science concerned with the physical structure of animals and plants
2. (Anatomy) the physical structure of an animal or plant or any of its parts
3. (Anatomy) a book or treatise on this subject
4. (Anatomy) dissection of an animal or plant
5. any detailed analysis: the anatomy of a crime.
6. informal the human body
[C14: from Latin anatomia, from Greek anatomē, from anatemnein to cut up, from ana- + temnein to cut]

a•nat•o•my

(əˈnæt ə mi)

n., pl. -mies.
1. the science dealing with the structure of animals and plants.
2. the structure of an animal or plant, or of any of its parts.
3. dissection of all or part of an animal or plant in order to study its structure.
4. Informal. the human body.
5. an analysis or minute examination.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin anatomia < Greek anatom(ḗ) a cutting up (see ana-, -tome) + Latin -ia -y3]

a·nat·o·my

(ə-năt′ə-mē)
1. The structure of an animal or a plant or any of its parts.
2. The scientific study of the shape and structure of living things.

anatomical (ăn′ə-tŏm′ĭ-kəl) adjective

Anatomy


the study of the body and its parts. — anatomist, n. — anatomical, adj.
Obsolete, human anatomy.
the study concerned with the measurements of the proportions, size, and weight of the human body. — anthropometrist, n. — anthropometric, anthropometrical, adj.
Physiology, Rare. the labeling of the type of body structure by nonanthropometric means.
the anatomy of the human body. — anthropotomist, n. — anthropotomical, adj.
Physiology. the study of aponeuroses, membranes that can serve as muscle sheaths or as connectors between muscles and tendons.
the scientific description of the arterial system. — arteriographic, arteriographical, adj.
a written work on the ligaments of the human body. — desmographic, desmographical, adj.
the branch of anatomy and physiology that studies secretions and the secretory glands.
an abnormal physical condition characterized by extensive structural defects of the skeleton and by gross mental deficiency.
the description of the structure and function of the liver. — hepatographic, hepatographical, adj.
the description of the structure and function of kidneys. — heprographic, heprographical, adj.
a branch of anatomy that deals with the microscopic features of animal and plant tissues. Also called microscopical anatomy. — histologist, n. — histological, adj.
the scientific description of the larynx. — laryngographic, laryngographical, adj.
histology.
the measurement of muscular phenomena, such as the velocity and intensity of muscular contractions. — myographic, adj.
1. the branch of anatomy that studies muscles and musculature.
2. the muscular makeup of an animal or anatomical unit. — myologic, adj.
the scientific description of the organs of plants and animals. — organographist, n. — organographic, organographical, adj.
the branch of anatomy that studies the skeleton and bones. — osteologist, n. — osteologie, osteological, adj.
the study of pelvic structure. — pelycologic, pelycological, adj.
the scientific description of the pharynx. — pharyngographic, pharyngographical, adj.
1. an account of the structure and function of the lungs.
2. the recording of the activity of the lungs during respiration. — pneumograph, n. — pneumographic, pneumographical, adj.
1. a person who dissects cadavers for the purpose of anatomical demonstration.
2. a person who performs autopsies. — prosectorial, adj.
the branch of anatomy that studies the viscera.
an anatomical treatise on or description of the joints and ligaments of the body.
1. the anatomy of the ligaments of the body.
2. the science or study of ligaments.
the condition of having a series of similar parts with the same spatial orientation, e.g. the ribs. — syntropic, adj.
the joining of two or more bones by muscle.
1. the dissection of animals other than man.
2. the anatomy of animals. — zootomist, n. — zootomic, zootomical, adj.

anatomy

Study of the structure of organisms.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.anatomy - the branch of morphology that deals with the structure of animalsanatomy - the branch of morphology that deals with the structure of animals
apparatus - (anatomy) a group of body parts that work together to perform a given function; "the breathing apparatus"
vallecula, groove - (anatomy) any furrow or channel on a bodily structure or part
partition - (anatomy) a structure that separates areas in an organism
septum - (anatomy) a dividing partition between two tissues or cavities
fissure - (anatomy) a long narrow slit or groove that divides an organ into lobes
sulcus - (anatomy) any of the narrow grooves in an organ or tissue especially those that mark the convolutions on the surface of the brain
hilum, hilus - (anatomy) a depression or fissure where vessels or nerves or ducts enter a bodily organ; "the hilus of the kidney"
cingulum - (anatomy) an encircling structure (as the ridge around the base of a tooth)
concha - (anatomy) a structure that resembles a shell in shape
radicle - (anatomy) a small structure resembling a rootlet (such as a fibril of a nerve)
tube-shaped structure, tube - (anatomy) any hollow cylindrical body structure
fundus - (anatomy) the base of a hollow organ or that part of the organ farthest from its opening; "the uterine fundus"; "the fundus of the stomach"
punctum - (anatomy) a point or small area
meniscus, semilunar cartilage - (anatomy) a disk of cartilage that serves as a cushion between the ends of bones that meet at a joint
bodily cavity, cavum, cavity - (anatomy) a natural hollow or sinus within the body
diaphragm, midriff - (anatomy) a muscular partition separating the abdominal and thoracic cavities; functions in respiration
apophysis - (anatomy) a natural outgrowth or projection on an organ or body part such as the process of a vertebra
lobe - (anatomy) a somewhat rounded subdivision of a bodily organ or part; "ear lobe"
pouch, pocket - (anatomy) saclike structure in any of various animals (as a marsupial or gopher or pelican)
articulatio, joint, articulation - (anatomy) the point of connection between two bones or elements of a skeleton (especially if it allows motion)
paries, wall - (anatomy) a layer (a lining or membrane) that encloses a structure; "stomach walls"
cornu - (anatomy) any structure that resembles a horn in shape
corona - (anatomy) any structure that resembles a crown in shape
ruga - (anatomy) a fold or wrinkle or crease; "rugae of the stomach"
tentorium - (anatomy) a fold of dura mater that covers the cerebellum and supports the occipital lobes of the cerebrum
zona, zone - (anatomy) any encircling or beltlike structure
applied anatomy, clinical anatomy - the practical application of anatomical knowledge to diagnosis and treatment
comparative anatomy - the study of anatomical features of animals of different species
developmental anatomy - the branch of anatomy that studies structural changes of an individual from fertilization to maturity
functional anatomy, morphophysiology, physiological anatomy - the study of anatomy in its relation to function
gross anatomy, macroscopic anatomy - the study of the structure of the body and its parts without the use of a microscope
microscopic anatomy - the study of microscopic structures of tissues and organs
neuroanatomy - the anatomy of the nervous system
osteology - the branch of anatomy that studies the bones of the vertebrate skeleton
regional anatomy, topographic anatomy, topology - the study of anatomy based on regions or divisions of the body and emphasizing the relations between various structures (muscles and nerves and arteries etc.) in that region
morphology - the branch of biology that deals with the structure of animals and plants
base - (anatomy) the part of an organ nearest its point of attachment; "the base of the skull"
incisura, incisure - (anatomy) a notch or small hollow
distal - situated farthest from point of attachment or origin, as of a limb or bone
proximal - situated nearest to point of attachment or origin; "the proximal end of a bone"
distal - directed away from the midline or mesial plane of the body
mesial - being in or directed toward the midline or mesial plane of the body
mesomorphic, muscular - having a robust muscular body-build characterized by predominance of structures (bone and muscle and connective tissue) developed from the embryonic mesodermal layer
oral - of or involving the mouth or mouth region or the surface on which the mouth is located; "the oral cavity"; "the oral mucous membrane"; "the oral surface of a starfish"
aboral - opposite to or away from the mouth; "the aboral surface of a starfish"
ampullar, ampullary - of or related to an ampulla
2.anatomy - alternative names for the body of a human beinganatomy - alternative names for the body of a human being; "Leonardo studied the human body"; "he has a strong physique"; "the spirit is willing but the flesh is weak"
individual, mortal, person, somebody, someone, soul - a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"
human, human being, homo, man - any living or extinct member of the family Hominidae characterized by superior intelligence, articulate speech, and erect carriage
body, organic structure, physical structure - the entire structure of an organism (an animal, plant, or human being); "he felt as if his whole body were on fire"
person - a human body (usually including the clothing); "a weapon was hidden on his person"
juvenile body - the body of a young person
adult body - the body of an adult human being
male body - the body of a male human being
female body - the body of a female human being
3.anatomy - a detailed analysis; "he studied the anatomy of crimes"
analysis - an investigation of the component parts of a whole and their relations in making up the whole

anatomy

noun
1. structure, build, make-up, frame, framework, composition He had worked extensively on the anatomy of living animals.
2. examination, study, division, inquiry, investigation, analysis, dismemberment, dissection a troubling essay on the anatomy of nationhood

anatomy

noun
The separation of a whole into its parts for study:
Translations
تشريحعِلْم التَشْريح
anatomie
anatomi
anatoomia
anatomia
anatomija
anatómia
líffærafræîi
anatomia
anatomijaanatominisanatomiškaianatomiškasanatomas
anatomijapreparēšana
anatómia

anatomy

[əˈnætəmɪ] N
1. (Med) → anatomía f
2. (hum) (= body) → anatomía f
3. (frm) (= analysis) → análisis m inv minucioso, disección f

anatomy

[əˈnætəmi]
n
(= subject, study) → anatomie f
(= body) [person, animal] → anatomie f
modif [lesson, book] → d'anatomie

anatomy

nAnatomie f; (= structure also)Körperbau m; (fig)Struktur fund Aufbau m; on a certain part of her anatomy (euph)an einer gewissen Stelle (euph)

anatomy

[əˈnætəmɪ] nanatomia

anatomy

(əˈnӕtəmi) noun
the science of the structure of the (usually human) body, especially the study of the body by cutting up dead animal and human bodies.
anatomical (ӕnəˈtomikl) adjective
ˌanaˈtomically adverb
aˈnatomist noun
a person who specializes in anatomy.

a·nat·o·my

n. anatomía, ciencia que estudia la estructura del cuerpo humano y de sus órganos;
macroscopic ______ macroscópica, estudio de estructuras que se distinguen a simple vista;
topographic ______ topográfica, estudio de estructuras y partes de las mismas en las distintas regiones del cuerpo.

anatomy

n anatomía
References in classic literature ?
Thus speak of the whale, the great Cuvier, and John Hunter, and Lesson, those lights of zoology and anatomy.
Did erudite Stubb, mounted upon your capstan, deliver lectures on the anatomy of the Cetacea; and by help of the windlass, hold up a specimen rib for exhibition?
But only for a minute -- only while he could button the flower inside his jacket, next his heart -- or next his stomach, possibly, for he was not much posted in anatomy, and not hypercritical, any- way.
The latter had never been under-drawn: its entire anatomy lay bare to an inquiring eye, except where a frame of wood laden with oatcakes and clusters of legs of beef, mutton, and ham, concealed it.
My heart failed me when I saw him squaring at me with every demonstration of mechanical nicety, and eyeing my anatomy as if he were minutely choosing his bone.
He had been educated in Edinburgh, the city of his birth, and in London; and had in one way and another picked up a smattering of anatomy, music, electricity, and telegraphy.
While they were talking, fate so willed it that one of the company in a mummers' dress with a great number of bells, and armed with three blown ox-bladders at the end of a stick, joined them, and this merry-andrew approaching Don Quixote, began flourishing his stick and banging the ground with the bladders and cutting capers with great jingling of the bells, which untoward apparition so startled Rocinante that, in spite of Don Quixote's efforts to hold him in, taking the bit between his teeth he set off across the plain with greater speed than the bones of his anatomy ever gave any promise of.
And that there may be less difficulty in understanding what I am about to say on this subject, I advise those who are not versed in anatomy, before they commence the perusal of these observations, to take the trouble of getting dissected in their presence the heart of some large animal possessed of lungs (for this is throughout sufficiently like the human), and to have shown to them its two ventricles or cavities: in the first place, that in the right side, with which correspond two very ample tubes, viz.
The guests were now seated at the table laden with the first course, which they ate as provincials eat, without shame at possessing a good appetite, and not as in Paris, where it seems as if jaws gnashed under sumptuary laws, which made it their business to contradict the laws of anatomy.
There was, at that period, a certain extramural teacher of anatomy, whom I shall here designate by the letter K.
Do you know the altogether of comparative anatomy and can say wherefore the qualities of brutes are in some men, and not in others?
It all lay in the surface of practical anatomy years ago, but no one had the temerity to touch it.