ancestor


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Related to ancestor: ancestor worship, Human ancestor

an·ces·tor

 (ăn′sĕs′tər)
n.
1. A person from whom one is descended, especially if more remote than a grandparent; a forebear.
2. A forerunner or predecessor.
3. Law The person from whom an estate has been inherited.
4. Biology The actual or hypothetical organism or stock from which later kinds evolved.

[Middle English auncestre, from Old French, from Latin antecessor, predecessor, from antecessus, past participle of antecēdere, to precede : ante-, ante- + cēdere, to go; see ked- in Indo-European roots.]
Synonyms: ancestor, forebear, forefather, progenitor
These nouns denote a person from whom one is descended: a chart showing the genealogy of her ancestors; land once owned by his forebears; a cemetery where some of my forefathers are buried; descended from illustrious progenitors.
Antonym: descendant

ancestor

(ˈænsɛstə)
n
1. (often plural) a person from whom another is directly descended, esp someone more distant than a grandparent; forefather
2. (Biology) an early type of animal or plant from which a later, usually dissimilar, type has evolved
3. a person or thing regarded as a forerunner of a later person or thing: the ancestor of the modern camera.
[C13: from Old French ancestre, from Late Latin antecēssor one who goes before, from Latin antecēdere; see antecede]
ˈancestress fem n

an•ces•tor

(ˈæn sɛs tər; esp. Brit. -sə stər)

n.
1. a person from whom one is descended; forebear; progenitor.
2.
a. the form or stock from which an organism has descended.
b. the actual or assumed earlier type from which a species or other taxon evolved.
3. an object, idea, style, or occurrence serving as a prototype, forerunner, or inspiration to a later one.
4. a person from whom mental, artistic, spiritual, etc., descent is claimed.
[1250–1300; < Old French < Latin antecessor antecessor]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ancestor - someone from whom you are descended (but usually more remote than a grandparent)ancestor - someone from whom you are descended (but usually more remote than a grandparent)
ancestress - a woman ancestor
forbear, forebear - a person from whom you are descended
forefather, sire, father - the founder of a family; "keep the faith of our forefathers"
foremother - a woman ancestor
primogenitor, progenitor - an ancestor in the direct line
relative, relation - a person related by blood or marriage; "police are searching for relatives of the deceased"; "he has distant relations back in New Jersey"
descendant, descendent - a person considered as descended from some ancestor or race

ancestor

noun
1. forefather, predecessor, precursor, forerunner, forebear, antecedent, progenitor He could trace his ancestors back seven hundred years.
forefather successor, offspring, descendant, progeny, inheritor
2. forerunner, predecessor, prototype, precursor The immediate ancestor of rock 'n' roll is rhythm and blues.

ancestor

noun
1. A person from whom one is descended:
Archaic: predecessor.
2. One that precedes, as in time:
Translations
سَلَفسَلَف، جَد أعْلى
předek
forfaderane
esi-isä
predak
forfaîir
先祖祖先
조상
kilmėprotėvisprotėvių
priekštecissencis
prednik
förfader
บรรพบุรุษ
tổ tiên

ancestor

[ˈænsɪstəʳ] N
1. (= person) → antepasado/a m/f
2. (fig) [of machine, idea, organization] → antecesor(a) m/f, predecesor(a) m/f

ancestor

[ˈænsɛstər] n
(lit)ancêtre mf, aïeul m
(fig) (= antecedent) → ancêtre mf

ancestor

nVorfahr m, → Ahne m; (= progenitor)Stammvater m; ancestor worshipAhnenkult m

ancestor

[ˈænsɪstəʳ] nantenato/a, avo/a

ancestor

(ˈӕnsistə) , ((American) -ses-) feminine ˈancestress noun
a person who was a member of one's family a long time ago and from whom one is descended.
anˈcestral (-ˈses-) adjective
ˈancestryplural ˈancestries noun
a line of ancestors coming down to one's parents. He is of noble ancestry.

ancestor

سَلَف předek forfader Vorfahre πρόγονος antepasado esi-isä ancêtre predak antenato 先祖 조상 voorouder stamfar przodek antepassado предок förfader บรรพบุรุษ ata tổ tiên 祖先

ancestor

n antepasado
References in classic literature ?
Caswall knew enough about the life of his ancestor in Paris to wish to know more fully and more thoroughly all that had been.
An ancestor of Marmaduke Temple had, about one hundred and twenty years before the commencement of our tale, come to the colony of Pennsylvania, a friend and co-religionist of its great patron.
As descendants of old English nobles still cherish in the traditions of their houses how that this king or that king tarried a day with some favored ancestor three hundred years ago, no doubt the descendants of the woman of Samaria, living there in Shechem, still refer with pardonable vanity to this conversation of their ancestor, held some little time gone by, with the Messiah of the Christians.
On such an occasion the author chanced to call to memory a rhyme recording three names of the manors forfeited by the ancestor of the celebrated Hampden, for striking the Black Prince a blow with his racket, when they quarrelled at tennis;
And there is nothing in the context to show that Hesiod's Amphidamas is to be identified with that Amphidamas whom Plutarch alone connects with the Lelantine War: the name may have been borne by an earlier Chalcidian, an ancestor, perhaps, of the person to whom Plutarch refers.
And yet I hardly know how that could have been, either, because the baron's ancestor, who was an amiable man, felt very sorry afterwards for having been so rash, and laying violent hands upon a quantity of stone and timber which belonged to a weaker baron, built a chapel as an apology, and so took a receipt from Heaven, in full of all demands.
May God rest his soul in Paradise, and the soul of his Virginian ancestor, if, indeed, they are two souls.
And not merely so, but was it hereditary in him, and transmitted down, as a precious heirloom, from that bearded ancestor, in whose picture both the expression and, to a singular degree, the features of the modern Judge were shown as by a kind of prophecy?
Your ancestor was one of the twelve knights who assisted the Lord of Estremavilla in Normandy in his conquest of Glamorganshire.
The Fox replied, "You have chosen a most appropriate subject for your falsehoods, as I am sure none of your ancestors will be able to contradict you.
For those things, whose unmanageableness, even when represented on paper, makes one gasp with a sort of amused horror, were manned by men who are his direct professional ancestors.
These are our ancestors, and their history is our history.