ancestry


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an·ces·try

 (ăn′sĕs′trē)
n. pl. an·ces·tries
1. Ancestral descent or lineage.
2. Ancestors considered as a group.

[Middle English auncestrie, alteration (influenced by auncestre, ancestor) of Old French ancesserie, from ancessour, ancestor, from Latin antecessor; see ancestor.]

ancestry

(ˈænsɛstrɪ)
n, pl -tries
1. lineage or descent, esp when ancient, noble, or distinguished
2. ancestors collectively

an•ces•try

(ˈæn sɛs tri; esp. Brit. -sə stri)

n., pl. -tries.
1. ancestral descent; lineage.
2. honorable or distinguished descent: famous by title and ancestry.
3. a series of ancestors.
4. the origin of a phenomenon, object, idea, or style.
5. the history or developmental process of a phenomenon, object, idea, or style.
[1300–50]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ancestry - the descendants of one individualancestry - the descendants of one individual; "his entire lineage has been warriors"
kinfolk, kinsfolk, phratry, family line, sept, folk, family - people descended from a common ancestor; "his family has lived in Massachusetts since the Mayflower"
side - a family line of descent; "he gets his brains from his father's side"
family tree, genealogy - successive generations of kin
2.ancestry - inherited properties shared with others of your bloodlineancestry - inherited properties shared with others of your bloodline
hereditary pattern, inheritance - (genetics) attributes acquired via biological heredity from the parents
descent, extraction, origin - properties attributable to your ancestry; "he comes from good origins"
bloodline, pedigree - ancestry of a purebred animal

ancestry

noun origin, house, family, line, race, stock, blood, ancestors, descent, pedigree, extraction, lineage, forebears, antecedents, parentage, forefathers, genealogy, derivation, progenitors They can trace their ancestry back to the seventeenth century.

ancestry

noun
One's ancestors or their character or one's ancestral derivation:
Translations
سِلْسِلَة السَّلَف وَالأجْداد
původrod
slægt
forfeîur, ætterni
predniki
atalarecdat

ancestry

[ˈænsɪstrɪ] N (= lineage) → ascendencia f, linaje m; (= noble birth) → abolengo m

ancestry

[ˈænsɛstri] n
(= ancestors) → ancêtres mpl, aïeux mpl
(= lineage) → ascendance f
of Japanese ancestry → d'ascendance japonaise
to trace one's ancestry → constituer son arbre généalogique

ancestry

n (= descent)Abstammung f, → Herkunft f; (= ancestors)Ahnenreihe f, → Familie f; to trace one’s ancestryseine Abstammung zurückverfolgen; of royal ancestryköniglicher Abstammung or Herkunft

ancestry

[ˈænsɪstrɪ] n (origin) → lignaggio, ascendenza, stirpe f; (forebears) → antenati mpl

ancestor

(ˈӕnsistə) , ((American) -ses-) feminine ˈancestress noun
a person who was a member of one's family a long time ago and from whom one is descended.
anˈcestral (-ˈses-) adjective
ˈancestryplural ˈancestries noun
a line of ancestors coming down to one's parents. He is of noble ancestry.

ancestry

n. ascendencia; extracción étnica, raza; alcurnia.
References in classic literature ?
Morally, as well as materially, there was a coarser fibre in those wives and maidens of old English birth and breeding than in their fair descendants, separated from them by a series of six or seven generations; for, throughout that chain of ancestry, every successive mother had transmitted to her child a fainter bloom, a more delicate and briefer beauty, and a slighter physical frame, if not character of less force and solidity than her own.
Yea, more than equally, thought Ahab; since both the ancestry and posterity of Grief go further than the ancestry and posterity of Joy.
He was very proud of his old Virginian ancestry, and in his hospitalities and his rather formal and stately manners, he kept up its traditions.
He is fitter to do the juggling tricks of the Norman chivalry than to maintain the fame and honour of his English ancestry with the glaive and brown-bill, the good old weapons of his country.
In reverting to the period of our origin, other nations have generally been compelled to plunge into the chaos of impenetrable antiquity, or to trace a lawless ancestry into the caverns of ravishers and robbers.
We should like to know her lineage, race, and ancestry," said Vivaldo.
As it is of the utmost importance for Society that Irregular births should be discouraged, it follows that no Woman who has any Irregularities in her ancestry is a fit partner for one who desires that his posterity should rise by regular degrees in the social scale.
They know that I am the daughter of ten thousand jeddaks, that I trace my ancestry straight back without a break to the builder of the first great waterway, and they, who do not even know their own mothers, are jealous of me.
Instead were these frail creatures who had forgotten their high ancestry, and the white Things of which I went in terror.
I tell you what, my dear fellow," said Chateau-Renaud, "I cannot imagine what objection you can possibly have to Mademoiselle Danglars -- that is, setting aside her want of ancestry and somewhat inferior rank, which by the way I don't think you care very much about.
But should domestic tyranny oppress us, or the invader's step pollute our soil, still may the Gray Champion come, for he is the type of New England's hereditary spirit; and his shadowy march, on the eve of danger, must ever be the pledge, that New England's sons will vindicate their ancestry.
This was the Lord de Vere, who, when at home, was said to spend much of his time in the burial vault of his dead progenitors, rummaging their mouldy coffins in search of all the earthly pride and vainglory that was hidden among bones and dust; so that, besides his own share, he had the collected haughtiness of his whole line of ancestry.