anchor


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anchor
top to bottom: Danforth, admiralty, and stockless anchors

an·chor

 (ăng′kər)
n.
1. Nautical A heavy object attached to a vessel by a cable, rope, or chain and dropped into the water to keep the vessel in place either by its weight or by its flukes, which grip the bottom.
2. A rigid point of support, as for securing a rope.
3. A source of security or stability.
4.
a. An athlete, usually the strongest member of a team, who performs the last stage of a relay race or other competition.
b. The person at the end of a tug-of-war team.
5. An anchorperson.
v. an·chored, an·chor·ing, an·chors
v.tr.
1.
a. To secure (a vessel) with an anchor.
b. To secure with a fastener or similar device: bolts anchoring the deck to the house. See Synonyms at fasten.
c. To cause to be fixed in place; fix or immobilize: fear anchoring him in the dark hallway; mussels anchoring themselves to a rock.
d. To cause to feel attached or secure: memories anchoring us to our home town.
e. To provide a basis for; establish or found: "innovative cuisines firmly anchored in tradition" (Gourmet Magazine).
2. Sports To serve as an anchor for (a team or competition): anchor a relay race.
3. To narrate or coordinate (a newscast).
4. To provide or form an anchor store for: Two major stores anchor each end of the shopping mall.
v.intr.
Nautical To drop anchor or lie at anchor.

[Middle English anker, ancher, from Old English ancor, from Latin ancora, anchora, from Greek ankura.]

anchor

(ˈæŋkə)
n
1. (Nautical Terms) any of several devices, usually of steel, attached to a vessel by a cable and dropped overboard so as to grip the bottom and restrict the vessel's movement
2. an object used to hold something else firmly in place: the rock provided an anchor for the rope.
3. a source of stability or security: religion was his anchor.
4. (Building)
a. a metal cramp, bolt, or similar fitting, esp one used to make a connection to masonry
b. (as modifier): anchor bolt; anchor plate.
5. (Team Sports, other than specified)
a. the rear person in a tug-of-war team
b. short for anchorman, anchorwoman
6. (Nautical Terms) at anchor (of a vessel) anchored
7. (Nautical Terms) cast anchor come to anchor drop anchor to anchor a vessel
8. (Nautical Terms) drag anchor See drag13
9. (Nautical Terms) ride at anchor to be anchored
10. (Nautical Terms) weigh anchor to raise a vessel's anchor or (of a vessel) to have its anchor raised in preparation for departure
vb
11. (Nautical Terms) to use an anchor to hold (a vessel) in one place
12. to fasten or be fastened securely; fix or become fixed firmly
13. (Broadcasting) (tr) radio television to act as an anchorman on
[Old English ancor, from Latin ancora, from Greek ankura; related to Greek ankos bend; compare Latin uncus bent, hooked]

an•chor

(ˈæŋ kər)

n.
1. a heavy device dropped by a chain, cable, or rope to the bottom of a body of water for restraining the motion of a vessel or other floating object.
2. any similar device for holding fast or checking motion.
3. a person or thing that can be relied on for support, stability, or security; mainstay.
4. the main broadcaster on a program of news, sports, etc.
5. a television program that attracts many viewers who are likely to stay tuned for the programs that follow.
6. a well-known store, esp. a department store, that attracts customers to the shopping center in which it is located.
7. Also, anchorman.
a. the person on a sports team, esp. a relay team, who competes last.
b. the person farthest to the rear on a tug-of-war team.
8. anchors, Slang. the brakes of an automobile.
v.t.
9. to hold fast by an anchor.
10. to fix or fasten; affix firmly: to anchor a button to a sleeve.
11. to act or serve as a radio or television anchor for: to anchor the evening news.
v.i.
12. to drop anchor; lie or ride at anchor.
13. to keep hold or be firmly fixed.
14. to act or serve as a radio or television anchor.
Idioms:
at anchor, kept in place by an anchor.
[before 900; Old English ancor, ancer < Latin an-c(h)ora < Greek ánkȳra]
an′chor•a•ble, adj.
an′chor•like`, adj.

anchor


Past participle: anchored
Gerund: anchoring

Imperative
anchor
anchor
Present
I anchor
you anchor
he/she/it anchors
we anchor
you anchor
they anchor
Preterite
I anchored
you anchored
he/she/it anchored
we anchored
you anchored
they anchored
Present Continuous
I am anchoring
you are anchoring
he/she/it is anchoring
we are anchoring
you are anchoring
they are anchoring
Present Perfect
I have anchored
you have anchored
he/she/it has anchored
we have anchored
you have anchored
they have anchored
Past Continuous
I was anchoring
you were anchoring
he/she/it was anchoring
we were anchoring
you were anchoring
they were anchoring
Past Perfect
I had anchored
you had anchored
he/she/it had anchored
we had anchored
you had anchored
they had anchored
Future
I will anchor
you will anchor
he/she/it will anchor
we will anchor
you will anchor
they will anchor
Future Perfect
I will have anchored
you will have anchored
he/she/it will have anchored
we will have anchored
you will have anchored
they will have anchored
Future Continuous
I will be anchoring
you will be anchoring
he/she/it will be anchoring
we will be anchoring
you will be anchoring
they will be anchoring
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been anchoring
you have been anchoring
he/she/it has been anchoring
we have been anchoring
you have been anchoring
they have been anchoring
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been anchoring
you will have been anchoring
he/she/it will have been anchoring
we will have been anchoring
you will have been anchoring
they will have been anchoring
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been anchoring
you had been anchoring
he/she/it had been anchoring
we had been anchoring
you had been anchoring
they had been anchoring
Conditional
I would anchor
you would anchor
he/she/it would anchor
we would anchor
you would anchor
they would anchor
Past Conditional
I would have anchored
you would have anchored
he/she/it would have anchored
we would have anchored
you would have anchored
they would have anchored
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.anchor - a mechanical device that prevents a vessel from movinganchor - a mechanical device that prevents a vessel from moving
flue, fluke - flat bladelike projection on the arm of an anchor
grapnel anchor, grapnel - a light anchor for small boats
claw, hook - a mechanical device that is curved or bent to suspend or hold or pull something
mooring anchor - an anchor used to hold a mooring buoy or a channel marker in place
mushroom anchor - an anchor used for semipermanent moorings; has a bowl-shaped head that will dig in however it falls
shank, stem - cylinder forming a long narrow part of something
sheet anchor, waist anchor - spare anchor for use in emergency
vessel, watercraft - a craft designed for water transportation
2.anchor - a central cohesive source of support and stabilityanchor - a central cohesive source of support and stability; "faith is his anchor"; "the keystone of campaign reform was the ban on soft money"; "he is the linchpin of this firm"
support - something providing immaterial assistance to a person or cause or interest; "the policy found little public support"; "his faith was all the support he needed"; "the team enjoyed the support of their fans"
3.anchor - a television reporter who coordinates a broadcast to which several correspondents contributeanchor - a television reporter who coordinates a broadcast to which several correspondents contribute
television newscaster, television reporter, TV newsman, TV reporter - someone who reports news stories via television
Verb1.anchor - fix firmly and stablyanchor - fix firmly and stably; "anchor the lamppost in concrete"
fasten, fix, secure - cause to be firmly attached; "fasten the lock onto the door"; "she fixed her gaze on the man"
2.anchor - secure a vessel with an anchoranchor - secure a vessel with an anchor; "We anchored at Baltimore"
fasten, fix, secure - cause to be firmly attached; "fasten the lock onto the door"; "she fixed her gaze on the man"

anchor

noun
1. mooring, hook (Nautical), bower (Nautical), kedge, drogue, sheet anchor We lost our anchor, which caused the boat to drift.
2. support, second, stay, supporter, prop, backer, backbone, mainstay, comforter, tower of strength He provided an emotional anchor for her.
3. presenter, newscaster, reporter, commentator, broadcaster, newsreader, anchor man, anchor woman He was the anchor for the channel's 15-minute news programme.
verb
1. moor, harbour, dock, tie up, drop anchor, kedge, drop the hook, cast anchor, let go the anchor, lay anchor, come to anchor We could anchor off the pier.
2. secure, tie, fix, bind, chain, attach, bolt, fasten, affix The child's seatbelt was not properly anchored in the car.

anchor

verb
To make secure:
Idiom: make fast.
Translations
مِرْسَاةمِرْساة السَّفينَهمَلاذ، سَند، مَرْبَطيُرْسي، يَرْبُط السَّفينَه بِالمِرْساة
kotvakotvitopora
ankerforankringholde påkaste anker
ankkuriankkurivarustusankkuroidajuontaalinkki
sidro
horgonylehorgonyozrögzítő
akkerihaldreipileggjast viî festar; festa tryggilega
ancorasto
inkaraslaivų stovėjimo vietanuleidęs inkarąnuleisti inkarąpagrindas
drošs patvērumsenkursnoenkurotnoenkuroties
ancora
kotvakotviť
sidro
kotvasidro
ankareankra
สมอเรือ
çapaçıpademirdemir atmakdemirlemek
mỏ neo

anchor

[ˈæŋkəʳ]
A. N
1. (Naut) → ancla f
to be or lie or ride at anchorestar al ancla, estar anclado
to cast or drop anchorechar anclas
anchors aweigh!¡leven anclas!
see also weigh A3
2. (fig) → seguridad f, sostén m; (= person) → pilar m
B. VT
1. (Naut) → anclar
2. (fig) → sujetar (to a) → afianzar (to en)
3. (esp US) (TV, Rad) → presentar
C. VI (Naut) → anclar

anchor

[ˈæŋkər]
n
[boat] → ancre f
to drop anchor → jeter l'ancre, mouiller
to weigh anchor → lever l'ancre
to be at anchor [boat] → être à l'ancre, être au mouillage
(fig) (= secure point) → point m d'ancrage
[TV or radio programme] → présentateur/trice m/f
vi (= drop anchor) [ship] → jeter l'ancre, mouiller
vt
[+ boat, ship] → mettre à l'ancre
(= attach) → arrimer
to anchor sth to sth → attacher qch à qch
to anchor sth down → arrimer qch
[+ TV or radio programme] → présenter

anchor

n
(Naut) → Anker m; (fig: hope, love, person etc) → Zuflucht f, → Rettungsanker m; to cast or drop anchorAnker werfen, vor Anker gehen; to weigh or up anchorden Anker lichten; to be or lie or ride at anchorvor Anker liegen; to come to anchorvor Anker gehen; the stone served as an anchor for the tentder Stein diente dazu, das Zelt zu beschweren or am Boden festzuhalten
(esp US TV: = presenter) → Anchorman m, → Anchorwoman f, → Moderator(in) m(f)
vt (Naut, fig) → verankern; we anchored the tablecloth (down) with stoneswir beschwerten das Tischtuch mit Steinen; to be anchored in something (fig)in etw (dat)(fest) verankert sein
vi (Naut) → ankern, vor Anker gehen

anchor

:
anchorman
n pl <-men> (esp US TV) → Anchorman m, → Moderator m; (Sport) (in relay race) → Letzte(r) m; (in tug-of-war) → hinterster Mann; (fig)eiserne Stütze f, → Eckpfeiler m
anchor store
n (attractive store) → Magnetbetrieb m
anchorwoman
n pl <-women> (esp US TV) → Anchorwoman f, → Moderatorin f; (Sport: in relay race) → Letzte f

anchor

[ˈæŋkəʳ]
1. nancora (fig) → ancora di salvezza; (of team, organization) → perno, pilastro
to be (lying) at anchor → essere alla fonda
to drop anchor → gettare l'ancora
to weigh anchor → salpare or levare l'ancora
2. vt (also fig) → ancorare
3. viancorarsi

anchor

(ˈӕŋkə) noun
1. something, usually a heavy piece of metal with points which dig into the sea-bed, used to hold a boat in one position.
2. something that holds someone or something steady.
verb
to hold (a boat etc) steady (with an anchor). They have anchored (the boat) near the shore; He used a stone to anchor his papers.
ˈanchorage (-ridʒ) noun
a place which is safe, or used, for anchoring boats. a sheltered anchorage.
at anchor
(of a ship) anchored. The ship lay at anchor in the bay.

anchor

مِرْسَاة kotva anker Anker άγκυρα ancla ankkuri ancre sidro ancora anker anker kotwica âncora якорь ankare สมอเรือ çapa mỏ neo
References in classic literature ?
With a blissful sense of burdens lifted off, Meg and Jo closed their weary eyes, and lay at rest, like storm-beaten boats safe at anchor in a quiet harbor.
Finally they reached the point now known as Cape Gracias-a-Dios, and when they let the anchor go, and found that in a short time it came to rest on the floor of the ocean, some one of the sailors--perhaps Columbus himself-- is said to have remarked:
I just came to anchor in the corner of the sofy in the hall, without lettin' on to say that I was there, and took up a Webster's dictionary that was on the table and laid it open-- keerless like, on my knees, ez if I was sorter consultin' it--and kinder dozed off there, listenin' to you fellows gassin' with the young ladies, and that yer Miss Christie just snakin' music outer that pianner, and I reckon I fell asleep.
They are like those little nooks of still water, which border a rapid stream, where we may see the straw and bubble riding quietly at anchor, or slowly revolving in their mimic harbor, undisturbed by the rush of the passing current.
But I stood irresolute; when looking at a clock in the corner, he exclaimed I vum it's Sunday --you won't see that harpooneer to-night; he's come to anchor somewhere --come along then; do come; won't ye come?
Then they stood up the mast they called a spear, in its socket by my left foot, and I gripped it with my hand; lastly they hung my shield around my neck, and I was all complete and ready to up anchor and get to sea.
With a rattling song the starboard watch bent to their work and hove the cable short, then got the anchor home, and our bark moved off with a stately stride, and soon was bowling along at about two knots an hour.
Not only the anchor of hope, but the footing of fortitude was gone--at least for a moment; but the last I soon endeavoured to regain.
In a city dominated by the axe, alone at night, with natural sorrow rising in him for the sixty-three who had been that day put to death, and for to-morrow's victims then awaiting their doom in the prisons, and still of to-morrow's and to-morrow's, the chain of association that brought the words home, like a rusty old ship's anchor from the deep, might have been easily found.
Peggotty and the Yarmouth boatmen having put off in a gale of wind with an anchor and cable to the "Nelson" Indiaman in distress; and you shall go there another day, and find them deep in the evidence, pro and con, respecting a clergyman who has misbehaved himself; and you shall find the judge in the nautical case, the advocate in the clergyman's case, or contrariwise.
And now indeed I felt as if my last anchor were loosening its hold, and I should soon be driving with the winds and waves.
Let him neglect the responsibilities of his office, and he will inevitably anchor himself on the chance that the thing left undone may turn out not to be of the supposed importance.