anchoress


Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

an·cho·ress

 (ăng′kər-ĭs)
n.
A woman who has retired into seclusion for religious reasons.

[Middle English anchoryse, ankres, from ancre, anchorite, from Old English ancra, from Old Irish anchara, from Late Latin anachōrēta; see anchorite.]

an•cho•ress

(ˈæŋ kər ɪs)

n.
a woman who is an anchorite.
[1350–1400; Middle English ankres=ancre anchorite + -es -ess]
usage: See -ess.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, since their demise in 2003, a prominent Facebook petition calling for fresh material, fervent fan conventions and a collaboration with The Anchoress, prompted Mansun's frontman to finally unleash his solo venture.
I am not band but I think more Beatles their original than However, since their demise in 2003, a prominent Facebook petition calling for fresh material, fervent fan conventions and a collaboration with The Anchoress, prompted Mansun's frontman to finally unleash his solo venture.
Skindred - Volume (Napalm Records) Swnami - Swnami (Ika Ching) The Anchoress - Confessions of a Romance Novelist (Kscope)
Skindred - Volume (Napalm Records) | Swnami - Swnami (Ika Ching) | | The Anchoress - Confessions of a Romance Novelist (Kscope) Meilyr Jones
The band will be supported on May 22 by Welsh multi-instrumentalist The Anchoress for the duration of their 13-date UK tour.
Julian of Norwich was an English anchoress and an important Christian mystic and theologian.
Scholars of religion and of the Middle Ages offer help reading the work of French anchoress Colette (1381-1447), a major figure in reforming the Franciscan movement, to return convents to St.
No book could take up a quieter subject than The Anchoress, by Robyn Cadwallader.
1416) was an anchoress living in a cell attached to the church of St Julian.
Here, Stanford figures the former lover as the titular anchoress with a Southern road tripper's twist: that "debutante of solitudes arid lowriding.
At the time, I was reading Julian of Norwich, the medieval anchoress who wrote volumes of her "shewings"--Middle English for "showings," the revelations she had in her cell after a grave illness.