ancients


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an·cient 1

 (ān′shənt)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or belonging to times long past, especially before the fall of the Western Roman Empire (ad 476): ancient cultures. See Synonyms at old.
2. Of great age; very old: "The males live up to six months—positively ancient, for a bee" (Elizabeth Royte).
3. Archaic Having the qualities associated with age, wisdom, or long use; venerable: "You seem a sober, ancient Gentleman by your habit" (Shakespeare).
n.
1. A very old person.
2. A person who lived in times long past.
3. ancients
a. The peoples of the classical nations of antiquity.
b. The ancient Greek and Roman authors.

[Middle English auncien, from Old French, from Vulgar Latin *anteānus : Latin ante, before; see ant- in Indo-European roots + -ānus, adj. and n. suff.]

an′cient·ly adv.
an′cient·ness n.

an·cient 2

 (ān′shənt)
n.
1. Archaic An ensign; a flag.
2. Obsolete A flag-bearer or lieutenant.

[Alteration of ensign.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ancients - people who lived in times long past (especially during the historical period before the fall of the Roman Empire in western Europe)ancients - people who lived in times long past (especially during the historical period before the fall of the Roman Empire in western Europe)
plural, plural form - the form of a word that is used to denote more than one
people - (plural) any group of human beings (men or women or children) collectively; "old people"; "there were at least 200 people in the audience"
Roman Empire - an empire established by Augustus in 27 BC and divided in AD 395 into the Western Roman Empire and the eastern or Byzantine Empire; at its peak lands in Europe and Africa and Asia were ruled by ancient Rome
Translations

ancients

[ˈeɪnʃənts] NPL the ancientslos antiguos
References in classic literature ?
March mildly observed, "salad was one of the favorite dishes of the ancients, and Evelyn.
The island of Atlantis, and the islands and gardens of the Hesperides, a sort of terrestrial paradise, appear to have been the Great West of the ancients, enveloped in mystery and poetry.
A profound and scholarly Englishman--a specialist--who had made the great Heidelberg Tun his sole study for fifteen years, told me he had at last satisfied himself that the ancients built it to make German cream in.
Having a desire to see those ancients who were most renowned for wit and learning, I set apart one day on purpose.
Forty leagues farther is the Isle of Camaram, whose inhabitants are annoyed with little serpents, which they call basilisks, which, though very poisonous and deadly, do not, as the ancients have told us, kill with their eyes, or if they have so fatal a power, it is not at least in this place.
Happy the age, happy the time, to which the ancients gave the name of golden, not because in that fortunate age the gold so coveted in this our iron one was gained without toil, but because they that lived in it knew not the two words "mine" and "thine"
But I believed that I had already given sufficient time to languages, and likewise to the reading of the writings of the ancients, to their histories and fables.
The efficacy of various principles is now well understood, which were either not known at all, or imperfectly known to the ancients.
It is out of the lore and experience of the ancients and of all those who have studied the powers of the UnDead.
Certainly," said I, "this sea is quoted as one of the worst, and in the time of the ancients, if I am not mistaken, its reputation was detestable.
It was not that the sight of the wretched pony did not excite numerous smiles on the countenances of passers-by; but as against the side of this pony rattled a sword of respectable length, and as over this sword gleamed an eye rather ferocious than haughty, these passers-by repressed their hilarity, or if hilarity prevailed over prudence, they endeavored to laugh only on one side, like the masks of the ancients.
The man he sacrificed to his ambition, that innocent victim immolated on the altar of his father's faults, appeared to him pale and threatening, leading his affianced bride by the hand, and bringing with him remorse, not such as the ancients figured, furious and terrible, but that slow and consuming agony whose pangs are intensified from hour to hour up to the very moment of death.