androcentric


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an·dro·cen·tric

 (ăn′drō-sĕn′trĭk)
adj.
Centered or focused on men, often to the neglect or exclusion of women: an androcentric view of history; an androcentric health-care system.

an′dro·cen′trism n.
an′dro·cen′trist n.

androcentric

(ˌændrəʊˈsɛntrɪk)
adj
having or regarding man or the male sex as central or primary
ˌandroˈcentrism n
Translations

androcentric

[ˌændrəʊˈsɛntrik] ADJandrocéntrico
References in periodicals archive ?
In the androcentric imagination of ancient Greek medicine, the womb was viewed as a wandering animal.
Feminists have long railed against the androcentric nature of culture, history and indeed safety standards.
1) Derrida elaborated on this in his revision of the brotherhood-centered and androcentric politics--his terms--that incorporate the figure of the (male) friend ([1994] 1998, 12), stating that in Western culture the grammar of friendship excludes women (74).
Apart from going along with an orientalist image of his own faith, he was androcentric in his laws on women and Islam.
Shahani interrogates indigenous radical feminist critiques that cast queer politics as "western" without duly analyzing their own convenient effacements of hetero-patriarchal and androcentric gender and sexual ideologies.
Like many women in the Bible, Herodias and Salome have fallen prey to androcentric symbolism of the heretical woman, a literary topos to justify male superiority.
While I could confidently counter that my research was not androcentric or heterosexist I could not escape my standpoint as a European woman doing research in the Caribbean.
Together these artists will present the performance Sisyphos Has Been a Woman, which deals with our androcentric society and the role of women, which resembles the mythical Sisyphus, posing key questions.
Likewise, Linda Nochlin, Griselda Pollock, and Lisa Tickner, among others, have challenged the androcentric conceptualization of modernism.
Throughout the text, Christensen exposes root causes of Rastafarian culture's androcentric male-female relations.
However, given that the prevailing discourse of the world, for the most part, still stems from androcentric assumptions, the study of global issues from the perspective of gender continues to uncover feminist insights that are both valid and enlightening.
Chapter Two focuses on the rise of the female crime novel and the ways in which Denise Mina, Louise Welsh and Val McDermid have turned to popular fiction to craft a 'space of transgression' in which the androcentric nature of both genre and the modern Scottish polity might be theorised and thought through.