androcentric

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an·dro·cen·tric

 (ăn′drō-sĕn′trĭk)
adj.
Centered or focused on men, often to the neglect or exclusion of women: an androcentric view of history; an androcentric health-care system.

an′dro·cen′trism n.
an′dro·cen′trist n.

androcentric

(ˌændrəʊˈsɛntrɪk)
adj
having or regarding man or the male sex as central or primary
ˌandroˈcentrism n
Translations

androcentric

[ˌændrəʊˈsɛntrik] ADJandrocéntrico
References in periodicals archive ?
Gamesmanship and Androcentrism in Nineteen Eighty-Four.
Critically evaluate eurocentrism and androcentrism in mathematics.
In addition, the interpretation put forward exposed the continued androcentrism inherent in many sub-disciplines of archaeology, which, 30 years on from Conkey and Spector's (1984) transformative publication, remain locked in deeply problematic interpretative patterns.
Feminism addresses androcentrism, ecocriticism addresses anthropocentrism, and feminist ecocriticism (or ecofeminist literary criticism) addresses both together.
It cannot hurt to contest traditions of androcentrism in both religion and works of history by acknowledging (preferably the multiplicity of) long-ignored traditions of goddess worship around the world that pre- and long post-dated the rise of the major patriarchal religions.
but now it's a family talisman, reverently passed down from father to son (Aronofsky does not challenge the androcentrism of Sacred Scripture).
Johnson posits that the philosophical systems of Hellenistic dualism, patriarchal androcentrism and Cartesian dualism influenced theological thinking and squeezed earth and its myriad of creatures out to the edges of Christianity's spiritual concerns.
2) The primacy of substance from a hylomorphic metaphysical standpoint within the Christian anthropological tradition has reinscribed an implicit androcentrism and the privileging of a certain male normativity, which feminist theologians have raised to greater consciousness.
These "discourses of modernity" include individualism, mechanism, progress, rationalism, commodification, consumerism, anthropocentrism, androcentrism, and ethnocentrism.
The biggest challenge to Sharp's interpretation and deployment of Spinoza is the latter's anthropocentrism and androcentrism.